Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-jzjqj Total loading time: 0.315 Render date: 2022-08-08T02:36:31.830Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

6 - Schelling, Naturphilosophie, and “Mächtiges Überraschen”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2013

Angus Nicholls
Affiliation:
Queen Mary, University of London
Get access

Summary

During a conversation with H. E. G. Paulus that took place some time between 1794 and 1800, Goethe is reported to have expressed reservations about what Paulus refers to as the “damals gepriesene ‘absolute Spekulieren’” associated with German idealism — particularly the notion that both nature and human activity may be understood through the deployment of supersensuous or transcendental ideas (GG 1:777–78). Goethe is said to have asked how this notion of the “Übersinnliche” or supersensuous fits together with both human nature and “Naturphilosophie,” observing that the more humans labor, in spite of all Kant's warnings, on speculations about “das Übermenschliche,” the more would philosophizing eventually be finally directed towards “das Menschliche” and towards that which is intellectually and physically knowable about nature. Only through a combination of theoretical speculation and empirical investigation, suggested Goethe, could a true “Naturphilosophie” be comprehended (GG 1:778).

Goethe's use of the term Naturphilosophie suggests that this conversation may have taken place either during or after 1797, the year in which Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling's Ideen zu einer Philosophie der Natur (Ideas towards a Philosophy of Nature) appeared. Boyle reports that in November 1797, upon returning from a journey to Switzerland, Goethe obtained a copy of Schelling's Ideen. Half a year later, in May 1798, Goethe met with Schelling for the first time, one month prior to the publication of what Boyle calls “Schelling's first systematic essay in the new Naturphilosophie,” Von der Weltseele (On the World Soul; BGA 2:593).

Type
Chapter
Information
Goethe's Concept of the Daemonic
After the Ancients
, pp. 202 - 225
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×