Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-mrcq8 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-24T12:54:20.164Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

6 - Globalization and the Role of the State in the Asia-Pacific

from Part II - Economic Regionalism and Global Influences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2015

Martin Andersson
Affiliation:
Lund University
Christer Gunnarsson
Affiliation:
Lund University
Fredrik Gustafsson
Affiliation:
Lund University
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION: QUESTIONING THE EAST ASIAN MIRACLE AS A UNIVERSAL MODEL

The so-called economic miracle in the Asia-Pacific region is clearly the most spectacular development experience the world has seen during the second half of the twentieth century. It has provoked scholars in the social sciences, development economists in particular, to rethink theories of economic development and social change, and has urged policymakers to reconsider and reformulate strategies and policies. The experience of the Asia-Pacific region has rightly been held up as a case of development worth studying and learning from. It has been the case in point for numerous empirical studies and it has generated an abundance of theorizing, not least about the role of political institutions in economic development. This chapter looks at the new role for the state and the changing policies that have emerged with globalization among some of the ASEAN states since the mid-1980s.

The uniqueness of the Asia-Pacific economic transformation is that it has three, beneficial, interlinked characteristics. First, extremely high rates of economic growth have been maintained over a period of several decades. Second, economic growth has been associated with a process of large-scale industrialization and structural transformation and modernization of society. Third, the gains from economic growth appear to have been shared by the population in a reasonably equitable manner.

The challenge to conventional development theory, and theory of social change in general, posed by the Asia-Pacific experience has been considerable. In short, the main controversy in the debate has been over the question of whether the Asia-Pacific growth experience confirms or challenges the universality of a “Western” road to industrialization and modernization, which boils down to the question of whether institutions normally associated with the market economy (ranging from regulatory frameworks, which enable impersonalized exchange, to financial and marketing institutions) have been implemented in the region or whether they have been substituted for by “Asian institutions”.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: ISEAS–Yusof Ishak Institute
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×