Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-t82dr Total loading time: 0.296 Render date: 2021-12-04T00:00:45.927Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

12 - International responses to combat maritime terrorism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 July 2009

Robert C. Beckman
Affiliation:
Associate Professor National University of Singapore
Victor V. Ramraj
Affiliation:
National University of Singapore
Michael Hor
Affiliation:
National University of Singapore
Kent Roach
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The terrorist attacks in the United States on 9/11 shocked not only the United States, but the entire international community. The attacks were unequivocally condemned by the United Nations Security Council and by most members of the international community. They triggered an almost immediate response led by the United States at the international level for additional measures and increased cooperation to prevent and suppress terrorist activities.

As a result of 9/11, states and international organizations were forced to completely rethink the threat of maritime terrorism. They recognized that if terrorists groups could strike powerful states using commercial aircraft, they could also strike using commercial shipping. The threat of maritime terrorism suddenly included the following: oil tankers being hijacked and used as weapons against other ships or port facilities; terrorists entering countries posing as seafarers, and weapons of mass destruction being shipped on merchant ships to terrorist organizations.

The United States recognized that the threat of maritime terrorism could not be dealt with unilaterally. International shipping is by its very nature, international, and can only be regulated through international cooperation. Since 9/11 the United States has led a two-pronged approach to obtain international cooperation to deal with the threat of maritime terrorism. First, it has worked vigorously and patiently to encourage the relevant United Nations bodies such as the UN Security Council, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) to take action that requires member states to impose new measures to deal with the threat of maritime terrorism.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×