Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-jlg5l Total loading time: 1.695 Render date: 2022-01-27T06:17:41.989Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

Chapter 28 - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation-Related Injuries in Elders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 July 2020

Kim A. Collins
Affiliation:
LifePoint Inc, South Carolina
Roger W. Byard
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide
Get access

Summary

The effort to resuscitate dying individuals goes back to ancient history and the Bible [1,2]. Resuscitation in the Middle Ages was forbidden, but later during the Renaissance, any prohibition against performing cardiac and pulmonary resuscitation was challenged, which finally led to the Enlightenment, where scholars attempted to scientifically solve the problem of sudden death [2].

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Gajic, V.. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation through centuries. Med Prefl 2001;64:234238.Google Scholar
Ekmektzoglou, K., Johnson, E.O., Syros, P., et al. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a historical perspective leading up to the end of the 19th century. Acta Med Hist Adriat 2012;10:83100.Google ScholarPubMed
ECC Committee, Subcommittees and Task Forces of the American Heart Association. 2005 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Circulation 2005;112(24 Suppl):IV1203.Google Scholar
Field, J.M., Hazinski, M.F., Sayre, M., et al. Part 1: Executive Summary of 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC. Circulation 2010;122(18 Suppl 3):S640S656.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kleinman, M.E., Brennan, E.E., Goldberger, Z.D., et al. Part 5: Adult basic life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: 2015 American Heart Association guidelines update for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care. Circulation. 2015;132(Suppl 2):S414S435.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kleinman, M. E., Goldberger, Z. D., Rea, T.. American Heart Association Focused Update on Adult Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality. An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Circulation 2017;136:e1e7.Google Scholar
Halperin, H.. A brief history of mechanical CPR devices. JEMS 2009;Sep: Suppl 12–3.Google Scholar
Pinto, D.C., Haden-Pinneri, K., Love, J.C.. Manual and automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): a comparison of associated injury patterns. J Forensic Sci 2013;58:904909.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Englund, E., Silfverstolpe, J., Halvarsson, B., Löfberg, H., Walther, C.. Injuries after cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A comparison between LUCAS mechanical CPR and standard CPR. Resuscitation 2008;77(Suppl):S13S14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wind, J., Bekkers, S.C., van Hooren, L.J., van Heurn, L.W.. Extensive injury after use of a mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation device. Am J Emerg Med 2009;27:1017.e1–2.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smekal, D., Johansson, J., Huzevka, T., Rubertsson, S.. No difference in autopsy detected injuries in cardiac arrest patients treated with manual chest compressions compared with mechanical compressions with the LUCAS™ device: a pilot study. Resuscitation 2009;80:11041107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Collins, K.A.. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation injuries. In Payne-James, J. and Byard, R.W., eds. Encyclopedia of Forensic and Legal Medicine, 2nd ed. Waltham: Elsevier, 2014, Chapter 119.Google Scholar
Collins, K.A., Tatum, C.J., Lantz, P.E.. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation injuries in children. In Collins, K.A. and Byard, R.W., eds. Forensic Pathology of Infancy and Childhood. New York: Springer Publishing, 2014, Chapter 14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Collins, K.A.. Elder maltreatment. In Payne-James, J. and Byard, R.W., eds. Encyclopedia of Forensic and Legal Medicine, 2nd ed. Waltham: Elsevier, 2014, Chapter 161.Google Scholar
Boland, L.L., Satterlee, P.A., Hokanson, J.S., et al. Chest compression injuries detected via routine post-arrest care in patients who survive to admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Prehosp Emerg Care 2015;19:2330.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dorak, M.. Injuries resulting from resuscitation procedures. In Tsokos, M., ed. Forensic Pathology Reviews, vol. 1. Totowa, New Jersey: Humana Press, 2004, pp. 293303.Google Scholar
Kim, M.J., Park, Y.S., Kim, S.W., et al. Chest injury following cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a prospective computed tomography evaluation. Resuscitation 2012;84:361364.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kaldirim, U., Toygar, M., Karbeyaz, K., et al. Complications of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in non-traumatic cases and factors affecting complications. Egyptian J Forensic Sci 2016;6:270274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hashimoto, Y., Moriya, F., Furumiya, J.. Forensic aspects of complications resulting from cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Leg Med (Tokyo) 2007;9:9499.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buschmann, C.T., Tsokos, M.. Frequent and rare complications of resuscitation attempts. Intensive Care Med 2009;35:397404.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lederer, W., Mair, D., Rabi, W., Baubin, M.. Frequency of rib and sternum fractures associated with out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation is underestimated by conventional chest x-ray. Resuscitation 2004;60:157162.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kam, A.C., Kam, P.C.. Scapular and proximal humeral head fractures. An unusual complication of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Anaesthesia 1994;49(12):10551057.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Machii, M., Inaba, H., Nakae, H., et al. Cardiac rupture by penetration of fractured sternum: a rare complication of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Resuscitation 2000;43(2):151153.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sokolove, P.E., Willis-Shore, J., Panacek, E.A.. Exsanguination due to a right ventricular rupture during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. J Emerg Med 2002;23:161164.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cameron, P.A.. Tension pneumothorax after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Med J Aust 1991;155:4447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bode, G., Joachim, H.. Differential diagnosis of accident and resuscitation traumas. Z Rechtsmed 1987;98(1):1932.Google ScholarPubMed
Krischer, J.P., Fine, E.G., Davis, J.H., et al. Complications of cardiac resuscitation. Chest 1987;92(2):287291.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ioannidia, G., Lazaridis, G., Baka, S., et al. Barotrauma and pneumothorax. J Thoracic Dis 2015; 7:S38S43.Google Scholar
Beydilli, H., Balci, Y., Erbas, M., et al. Liver laceration related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Turkish J Emerg Med 2016;16:7779.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reichardt, J.A., Casey, G.D., Krywko, D.. Gastric rupture from cardiopulmonary resuscitation or seizure activity? A case report. J Emerg Med 2010;39(3):309311.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kahn, A., Merrett, N., Selvendran, S.. Stomach perforation post cardiopulmonary resuscitation – a case report. Int J Surg Case Rep 2017;40:4346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Olds, K., Byard, R.W., Langlois, N.E.I.. Injuries associated with resuscitation – an overview. J Forensic Leg Med 2015;33:3943.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×