Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-ms7nj Total loading time: 0.414 Render date: 2022-08-09T21:38:59.311Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

5 - When rebels change their stripes: armed insurgents in post-war politics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2010

Mimmi Söderberg Kovacs
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Department of Peace and Conflict Research Uppsala University Sweden
Anna K. Jarstad
Affiliation:
Uppsala Universitet, Sweden
Timothy D. Sisk
Affiliation:
University of Denver
Get access

Summary

Following the announcement of the final results of the legislative elections in Afghanistan in 2005, there was widespread concern that powerful warlords, former Mujahideen commanders, and Taliban strongmen had been elected to power in this war-ravaged country. The same year a peace agreement was signed between the Indonesian government and the guerillas in the province of Aceh, aimed at ending the prolonged civil war. The provisions of the agreement laid out the political and legal conditions for the establishment of local political parties and thus gave the amnestied rebel movement an opportunity, for the first time, to pursue its aims through the ballot box. In Nepal, the Maoist rebels agreed to join the interim government following the peace agreement in 2006. But what are the prospects for democratization and sustainable peace in war-scattered societies in which formerly armed insurgents emerge as politicians? The purpose of this chapter is to address this pivotal issue that is likely to be of great relevance to researchers and policymakers alike concerned with better understanding the conditions that facilitate and obstruct a transition to both peaceful and democratic politics in intrastate armed conflicts.

Because issues related to failed governance and the unequal distribution of political power and public goods often are at the core of the causes of civil wars, conflict resolution in these contexts frequently includes efforts to introduce, reintroduce, or reinforce political reforms aiming at a transition to democratic politics.

Type
Chapter
Information
From War to Democracy
Dilemmas of Peacebuilding
, pp. 134 - 156
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
22
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×