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3 - “French” Muslims in Sudan

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2015

Gregory Mann
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
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Summary

The West African presence in the Nilotic Sudan is old, deep, and dynamic, and the West–East Sahelian axis long predates the arrival of European empires. But if they did not generate that axis of migration, the presence of those empires was the precondition for its transformation. In the twentieth century, pilgrimage routes, the phenomenon of the pilgrimage itself, and colonial awareness of it concealed new forms of migration from the West. In this period, when one looks at pilgrims, one should see migrants. Such a perspective requires adjusting our vision in two ways. First, social scientists have produced excellent studies of the phenomenon of the overland pilgrimage and pilgrim communities in Sudan and in Chad. But whether these are framed as studies of migration as such or emphasize instead the religious and phenomenological aspects of the hajj, they do not draw out themes of state practices and logics or of postcolonial politics. Rather, they naturalize the frame of government itself. Second, the political entities by which pilgrims and migrants were identified – and by which they on occasion identified themselves – underwent rapid changes during their long, and sometimes endless pilgrimages, rendering their own political affiliations obscure, or at least multiple. For long years, that did not matter at all. Then suddenly, for a few years in the mid-1950s, it mattered a great deal.

Type
Chapter
Information
From Empires to NGOs in the West African Sahel
The Road to Nongovernmentality
, pp. 93 - 119
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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References

Rapport Happé, 2ème partie: Informations sur quelques pays du Mer Rouge: Soudan, Yemen, Aden, Somalie, Ethiopie, Erythrée, Sept. 15, 1958, MAE, DAM, CADN Khartoum 110
Convention franco-brittanique sur la circulation des voyageurs, Annexe D: “Circulation des voyageurs entre l’AOB, l’AEF, et le Cameroun sous administration française,” Brazzaville, July 3 to 5, 1956, CADN Kano 9
P-V de la réunion … April 17, 1955, MAE, DAM, CADN Khartoum 110
Africa report # 72 (2010), 1, 10 n85
Gros, , Note préliminaire, Recensement des Ressortissants Africains français au Soudan, Nov. 1958, CADN Khartoum 155
Note pour la direction générale du personnel, Oct. 18, 1958, MAE, DAM, CADN Khartoum 155
Rapport Happé, 2′ partie: Informations sur quelques pays du Mer Rouge: Soudan, Yemen, Aden, Somalie, Ethiopie, Erythrée, Sept. 15, 1958, MAE, DAM, CADN Khartoum 110
M. Madeira Keita a exposé à Paris le point de vue du Soudan sur le problème du Sahara,” Soudan Matin, 571, Nov. 20, 1957
Doucouré, , Rapport sur le pèlerinage, 1961, BPN 104d398; and Doucouré to Min. Interieur, May 6, 1961, MIM E1/1
Mouradian, , Regles de séjour des africains étrangers en Ethiopie, Note à l’attention de M. le S.G., June 25, 1963, FPU 3386

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  • “French” Muslims in Sudan
  • Gregory Mann, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: From Empires to NGOs in the West African Sahel
  • Online publication: 05 January 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139061209.008
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  • “French” Muslims in Sudan
  • Gregory Mann, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: From Empires to NGOs in the West African Sahel
  • Online publication: 05 January 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139061209.008
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • “French” Muslims in Sudan
  • Gregory Mann, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: From Empires to NGOs in the West African Sahel
  • Online publication: 05 January 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139061209.008
Available formats
×