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5 - River Regulation

Impacts and Mitigation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2020

David Dudgeon
Affiliation:
The University of Hong Kong
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Summary

Non-native, exotic or introduced species fall into the category of aliens, whereas an invasive species is an alien that gives rise to ecological, economic, health or other concerns as a result of its establishment and spread, or has the potential to do so. Their effects include predation, competition and displacement, or hybridization with natives, as well as the transmission of parasites or pathogens. In cases where aliens are ecological engineers, the ramifications of their establishment are such that food-web architecture is disrupted, causing shifts in ecosystem structure and function. Predators (often piscivores) can cause marked changes in lakes (such as Victoria), but filter-feeing bivalves are also nuisance species. Fishes (often deliberately stocked), molluscs, crayfishes and other crustaceans, as well as aquatic macrophytes are frequently invasive, but aliens include a broad array of taxa. Both lakes and rivers in almost all continents are affected, especially those subject to human modification or with compromised water quality. The outcome of such invasions is replacement of natives, and on-going biotic homogenization of a formerly diverse global biota.

Type
Chapter
Information
Freshwater Biodiversity
Status, Threats and Conservation
, pp. 216 - 258
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • River Regulation
  • David Dudgeon, The University of Hong Kong
  • Book: Freshwater Biodiversity
  • Online publication: 16 June 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139032759.005
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  • River Regulation
  • David Dudgeon, The University of Hong Kong
  • Book: Freshwater Biodiversity
  • Online publication: 16 June 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139032759.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • River Regulation
  • David Dudgeon, The University of Hong Kong
  • Book: Freshwater Biodiversity
  • Online publication: 16 June 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139032759.005
Available formats
×