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Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2021

Michaël Roy
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Université Paris Nanterre
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Print publication year: 2021

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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Michaël Roy
  • Book: Frederick Douglass in Context
  • Online publication: 16 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108778688.040
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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Michaël Roy
  • Book: Frederick Douglass in Context
  • Online publication: 16 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108778688.040
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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Michaël Roy
  • Book: Frederick Douglass in Context
  • Online publication: 16 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108778688.040
Available formats
×