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4 - Traits

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 November 2021

Daniel C. Laughlin
Affiliation:
University of Wyoming
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Summary

It is important to be able to name the plants and animals in one’s environment, but knowing the names does not in and of itself advance the study of ecology. Frank Rigler argued that the species-oriented approach to studying ecology is intractable simply because of the time it would take to obtain enough information on each species to generalize to the community scale. Life on Earth can be named (or classified) in two complementary ways, using phylogeny and functional traits. Trait matrices provide the raw material for trait-based ecology. Compilations and screening are two distinct sources of data for trait matrices. Compilation of traits across studies is an important way of generating data for global-scale synthesis. Screening traits of local communities in the field or under standard conditions is the most effective way of generating quality data for local communities.

Type
Chapter
Information
A Framework for Community Ecology
Species Pools, Filters and Traits
, pp. 125 - 164
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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  • Traits
  • Paul A. Keddy, Daniel C. Laughlin, University of Wyoming
  • Book: A Framework for Community Ecology
  • Online publication: 18 November 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009067881.005
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  • Traits
  • Paul A. Keddy, Daniel C. Laughlin, University of Wyoming
  • Book: A Framework for Community Ecology
  • Online publication: 18 November 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009067881.005
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Traits
  • Paul A. Keddy, Daniel C. Laughlin, University of Wyoming
  • Book: A Framework for Community Ecology
  • Online publication: 18 November 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009067881.005
Available formats
×