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10 - The role of correctness in AI

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2010

Derek Partridge
Affiliation:
University of Exeter
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Summary

There is a continuing concern in AI that proof and correctness, the touchstones of the theory of programming, are being abandoned to the detriment of AI as a whole. On the other hand, we can find arguments to support just the opposite view, that attempts to fit AI programming into the specify-and-prove (or at least, specify-and-test correctness) paradigm of conventional software engineering, is contrary to the role of programming in AI research.

Similarly, the move to establish conventional logic as the foundational calculus of AI (currently seen in the logic programming approach and in knowledge-based decision-making implemented as a proof procedure) is another aspect of correctness in AI; and one whose validity is questioned (for example, Chandrasekaran's paper in section 1 opened the general discussion of such issues when it examined logic-based theories in AI, and Hewitt, in the section 11, takes up the more specific question of the role of logic in expert systems). Both sides of this correctness question are presented below.

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The Foundations of Artificial Intelligence
A Sourcebook
, pp. 361 - 362
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1990

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