Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-kpmwg Total loading time: 0.412 Render date: 2021-11-30T08:16:14.838Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

AI: a personal view

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2010

Derek Partridge
Affiliation:
University of Exeter
Get access

Summary

Artificial intelligence is the study of complex information-processing problems that often have their roots in some aspect of biological information processing. The goal of the subject is to identify interesting and solvable information-processing problems, and solve them.

The solution to an information-processing problem divides naturally into two parts. In the first, the underlying nature of a particular computation is characterized, and its basis in the physical world is understood. One can think of this part as an abstract formulation of what is being computed and why, and I shall refer to it as the “theory” of a computation. The second part consists of particular algorithms for implementing a computation, and so it specifies how. The choice of algorithm usually depends upon the hardware in which the process is to run, and there may be many algorithms that implement the same computation. The theory of a computation, on the other hand, depends only on the nature of the problem to which it is a solution. Jardine and Sibson (1971) decomposed the subject of cluster analysis in precisely this way, using the term “method” to denote what I call the theory of a computation.

To make the distinction clear, let us take the case of Fourier analysis. The (computational) theory of the Fourier transform is well understood, and is expressed independently of the particular way in which it is computed. There are, however, several algorithms for implementing a Fourier transform – the Fast Fourier transform (Cooley and Tukey, 1965), which is a serial algorithm, and the parallel “spatial” algorithms that are based on the mechanisms of coherent optics.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Foundations of Artificial Intelligence
A Sourcebook
, pp. 97 - 107
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×