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Chapter 6 - Associations between Autism Spectrum Disorder and Types of Offences

from Section 1 - An Overview: Definitions, Epidemiology and Policy Issues

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 May 2023

Jane M. McCarthy
Affiliation:
Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust and University of Auckland
Regi T. Alexander
Affiliation:
Hertfordshire Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust and University of Hertfordshire
Eddie Chaplin
Affiliation:
Institute of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University
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Summary

Although individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have been associated with many types of offences, some appear to be particularly problematic such as those involving cybercrime, interpersonal violence, arson and firesetting, terrorism, stalking, as well as some sexual offences. Clinical experience and research suggest that whilst individual motivations for offending may vary, an understanding of why these offences occur among individuals with an ASD should be informed by the associated difficulties and vulnerabilities. However, an understanding of ASD and the associated difficulties within the courts remains varied, raising questions around the important role experts play in trials involving individuals with an ASD.

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Forensic Aspects of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
A Clinician's Guide
, pp. 56 - 70
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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