Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-fwgfc Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-16T00:22:28.720Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

6 - INSTITUTIONAL CHOICE IN NEW DEMOCRACIES: FISCAL GOVERNANCE IN CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2010

Mark Hallerberg
Affiliation:
Hertie School of Governance, Berlin and Emory University, Atlanta
Rolf Rainer Strauch
Affiliation:
European Central Bank, Frankfurt
Jürgen von Hagen
Affiliation:
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Get access

Summary

The first four chapters concentrated on the design and effect of forms of fiscal governance in the countries that composed the European Union until 2004. The fifth chapter discussed why those countries adopted the fiscal institutions that they did. The focus was on the effects of deep fiscal crises, the competitiveness of the political system, and ideological distances within the government, which affect the choice of one form of fiscal governance or the other. Here we broaden the study to include the Central and Eastern Europe countries that joined the EU in May 2004, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia, as well as Bulgaria and Romania, which became members in January 2007.

This is a particularly interesting sample for our purposes. Government budgeting in the sense the term is used in modern, market economies did not exist under central planning, and the countries we consider had to create new legal frameworks, organizational modes, and decision-making structures from scratch. This makes the sample uniquely interesting for a study of institutional choice, because, unlike in the countries considered in the previous chapter, the weight of history and tradition in shaping the new institutions is very low. At the same time, we observe a fair degree of variation across the budgeting institutions of the countries. This raises the question of how the variation can be explained.

This chapter begins with a discussion of the evolution of budgeting institutions in the ten sample countries.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×