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Foreword

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2010

Avroy A. Fanaroff
Affiliation:
Eliza Henry Barnes Professor of Neonatology, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
David K. Stevenson
Affiliation:
Stanford University School of Medicine, California
William E. Benitz
Affiliation:
Stanford University School of Medicine, California
Philip Sunshine
Affiliation:
Stanford University School of Medicine, California
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Summary

Great strides have been taken in the relatively new specialty of neonatal–perinatal Medicine. The evidence upon which neonatal–perinatal medicine is practiced has expanded considerably and the rationale for many interventions is now supported by scientific data. Application of the biochemical and technologic advances to obstetrics and neonatology has improved the immediate and long-term outlook for the majority of neonates. Inspection of the major causes of neonatal mortality reveals that birth defects now head the list and there has been a sharp decline in death from respiratory disorders and immaturity. However, injury to the central nervous system continues to be a major concern. After an apparently normal pregnancy only a brief period of oxygen deprivation or exposure to other noxious stimuli may cause devastating and permanent injury to the central nervous system. Haldane is attributed to have said that “Hypoxia not only stops the motor, but also destroys the machinery.” Hypoxia can definitely destroy the developing brain. This edition of Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury is very timely and not only provides comprehensive coverage of the emerging issues and clinical trials in progress but also provides state-of-the-art deliberations on neuroimaging in addition to the infectious and metabolic encephalopathies.

Stevenson, Benitz, and Sunshine have assembled an outstanding group of contributors to tackle comprehensively the accumulating evidence on fetal and neonatal brain injury.

Type
Chapter
Information
Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury
Mechanisms, Management and the Risks of Practice
, pp. xv - xvi
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

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  • Foreword
    • By Avroy A. Fanaroff, Eliza Henry Barnes Professor of Neonatology, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
  • Edited by David K. Stevenson, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, William E. Benitz, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, Philip Sunshine, Stanford University School of Medicine, California
  • Book: Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury
  • Online publication: 10 November 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544774.001
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Save book to Dropbox

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  • Foreword
    • By Avroy A. Fanaroff, Eliza Henry Barnes Professor of Neonatology, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
  • Edited by David K. Stevenson, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, William E. Benitz, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, Philip Sunshine, Stanford University School of Medicine, California
  • Book: Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury
  • Online publication: 10 November 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544774.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Foreword
    • By Avroy A. Fanaroff, Eliza Henry Barnes Professor of Neonatology, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
  • Edited by David K. Stevenson, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, William E. Benitz, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, Philip Sunshine, Stanford University School of Medicine, California
  • Book: Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury
  • Online publication: 10 November 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544774.001
Available formats
×