Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-j4fss Total loading time: 0.642 Render date: 2022-09-30T17:48:13.711Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

2 - Commentary on Palsgraf v. Long Island Railroad Co.

from Part II - The Classics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2020

Martha Chamallas
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Lucinda M. Finley
Affiliation:
University at Buffalo, State University of New York
Get access

Summary

Widely regarded as the most celebrated case in US tort law, Palsgraf v. Long Island R.R. Co. denied recovery to a woman who was injured in an explosion while she was standing on a platform waiting for a train. Famed jurist Benjamin Cardozo used the occasion to announce the “zone of danger” test which denies recovery to plaintiffs who are outside the scope of foreseeable harm. The rewritten feminist dissent criticizes Cardozo’s approach for its subjectivity and underlying gender and class bias, charging that Cardozo employed a double standard, displayed a lack of sympathy for the plaintiff, and ignored well-established principles of common law. Rather than using an abstract relational concept of negligence, the feminist dissent focuses on the real relationships among the parties and faults the railroad for encouraging risky masculine behavior on the part of its employees. The accompanying commentary recounts the little-known history of the litigation and discusses the larger social, political, and economic context.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×