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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 September 2022

L. David Ritchie
Affiliation:
Portland State University
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Feeling, Thinking, and Talking
How the Embodied Brain Shapes Everyday Communication
, pp. 312 - 332
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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