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10 - Conclusion

from Part IV - Conclusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2022

Matthew Dyson
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Summary

This work has sought to explore four key places of overlap and potential interaction between crime and tort to better understand both the field as a whole and how and why legal systems change. It has tried to avoid normative claims bound to specific times, and particular theories about the relationship between tort and crime. It has shown that tort and crime in England and elsewhere address many of the same fact patterns, using concepts given the same names and with the same or similar function, and that both pursue some of the same purposes. It has presented a picture of complex and varied ways in which interactions and non-interactions have happened. Across that material, issues, processes and outputs have led to significant legal change over the period 1850–2020.

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Explaining Tort and Crime
Legal Development Across Laws and Legal Systems, 1850–2020
, pp. 477 - 482
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Conclusion
  • Matthew Dyson, University of Oxford
  • Book: Explaining Tort and Crime
  • Online publication: 07 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316534861.012
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  • Conclusion
  • Matthew Dyson, University of Oxford
  • Book: Explaining Tort and Crime
  • Online publication: 07 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316534861.012
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Matthew Dyson, University of Oxford
  • Book: Explaining Tort and Crime
  • Online publication: 07 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316534861.012
Available formats
×