Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-cxxrm Total loading time: 0.303 Render date: 2021-11-26T23:52:24.186Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

16 - Cultural Transfer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Jessica C. E. Gienow-Hecht
Affiliation:
Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University
Michael J. Hogan
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Thomas G. Paterson
Affiliation:
University of Connecticut
Get access

Summary

Since World War II, the analysis of cultural transfer has formed a powerful tool for the investigation of the United States' interaction with other nations. But unlike other approaches discussed in this volume, scholars have never devised a clear-cut terminology. Nor have they agreed on a single line of argument. Originating in political think tanks, the analysis of cultural transfer has meandered through university departments around the globe before finally reaching the public sphere, in the 1980s. By far the most pervasive concept has been “cultural imperialism,” a term and an ideology that gained a considerable amount of momentum in the 1960s and after, and that due to its longevity and powerful impact deserves our attention. Recently, however, scholars from a variety of disciplines suggested that the term “cultural imperialism” should be replaced with a broader, more inclusive word that avoids the simplistic active-passive dominator-victim dualism such as “cultural transmission.”

What does cultural transfer mean? Cultural transfer does not form a single, static “school” or a set of criteria. Similar to the New Left historians, most historians of cultural transfer probably would deny that they all belong to one school. The specific meaning of the term is not timeless but generated out of its various discourses, its use. In the past fifty years, the research on cultural transfer has been subjected to cycles, thus its significance must be viewed through historical lenses. First, the “cold warriors” lamented the absence of an aggressive cultural foreign policy among U.S. officials.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×