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14 - Plesiadapiformes

from Part IV - Archonta

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 September 2010

Christine M. Janis
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
Gregg F. Gunnell
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Mark D. Uhen
Affiliation:
University of Alabama, Birmingham
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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