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1 - Evidence as a Multidisciplinary Field

What Do the Law and the Discipline of Law Have to Offer?

from Part I - Evidence As an Area of Knowledge

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2022

Jordi Ferrer Beltrán
Affiliation:
Universitat de Girona
Carmen Vázquez
Affiliation:
Universitat de Girona
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Summary

My concern here is with articulating what Law as a discipline or the subject matters that it studies may have to offer to a distinct and semi-autonomous multi-disciplinary field. However, it is worth emphasising that throughout history, and especially in the twentieth century, our discipline has been quite open to outside influences in respect of evidence. I am personally interested in finding practical ways forward, although this paper addresses a more intellectual question: What might we as jurists, and our heritage of both theory and practical decision-making, contribute to an enterprise devoted to stimulating cross-fertilisation, co-operation and the search for a reasonably common core or family of cross-disciplinary relations for Evidence as a recognised multi-disciplinary field?

Type
Chapter
Information
Evidential Legal Reasoning
Crossing Civil Law and Common Law Traditions
, pp. 13 - 33
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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