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Part Six - Specialist Applications of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders and Depression

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2022

Gillian Todd
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia
Rhena Branch
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia
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Evidence-Based Treatment for Anxiety Disorders and Depression
A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Compendium
, pp. 505 - 640
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

Primary Sources

Bunge, E. L., Mandil, J., Consoli, A. J., & Gomar, M. (2017). CBT strategies for anxious and depressed children and adolescents: A clinician’s toolkit. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Friedberg, R. D., McClure, J. M., & Garcia, J. H. (2009). Cognitive therapy techniques for children and adolescents: Tools for enhancing practice. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C. (2017). Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice (3rd ed.). Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Sburlati, E. S., Lyneham, H. J., Schniering, C. A., & Rapee, R. M. (2014). Evidence-based CBT for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents: A competencies based approach. Wiley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weisz, J. R., & Kazdin, A. E. (2017). Evidence-based psychotherapies for children and adolescents (3rd ed.). Guilford Press.Google ScholarPubMed
Chorpita, B. F. (2006). Modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Cook, J. (2012). Wilma Jean the Worry Machine. Illustrated edition. National Center for Youth Issues.Google Scholar
Huebner, D. (2005). What to do when you worry too much: A kid’s guide to overcoming anxiety. Magination Press.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C., & Hedtke, K. A. (2006). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxious children: Therapist manual (3rd ed.). Workbook Pub.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C., & Hedtke, K. A. (2006). Coping cat workbook (2nd ed.). Workbook Pub.Google Scholar
Karst, P., & Stevenson, G. (2000). The Invisible String. Little, Brown.Google Scholar
Young, K. (2016). Hey Warrior! Little Steps Publishing.Google Scholar
Kennard, B. D., Hughes, J. L., & Foxwell, A. A. (2016). CBT for depression in children and adolescents: A guide to relapse prevention. Routledge.Google Scholar
Sullivan, L. (2013). How to get unstuck from the negative muck: A kid’s guide to getting rid of negative thinking. SOLNA Investments.Google Scholar
Temple, S. (1997). Brief therapy for adolescent depression (Practitioner’s resource series). Professional Resource Exchange.Google Scholar
Wilkes, T. C. R., Belsher, G., Rush, A. J., Frank, E., & Beck, A. T. (1994). Cognitive therapy for depressed adolescents. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Williams, K. N., & Crandal, B. R. (2015). Modular CBT for children and adolescents with depression: A clinician’s guide to individualized treatment. Harbinger.Google Scholar
The Ungame (All Ages, Families Version, Kids Version, and Teens Version): Ice-breaking style card game to help elicit getting to know the client, develop rapport, and process different topics (e.g., different emotions, scenarios, reflection on experiences).Google Scholar
Feelings in a Jar: Jar full of 365 cards with feeling words that can be processed and explored, or used in various games (e.g., acting out the emotions).Google Scholar
Teen Talk in a Jar: Jar full of thought-provoking questions to generate conversations with teenagers. Can be used at home at the dinner table or in group therapy with teens.Google Scholar
What If? In a Jar: Questions and Dilemmas to Get Kids Thinking about Choices: Cards in a jar with “what if” prompts for kids to explore decision-making regarding developmentally appropriate scenarios. Help prep kids to explore future scenarios and how best to cope.Google Scholar
Feelings Playing Cards: Playing cards with a variety of different emotions and corresponding faces. Can be used to play general card games and/or discuss and teach about different emotions.Google Scholar
The Talking, Feeling & Doing Game: Board game that explores talking, feeling, and doing cards that range from not-anxiety-provoking (e.g., What is your name?) to more anxiety-provoking (e.g., processing challenging situations). The game is aimed at gaining insight into the psychological issues most important at the time to the child based on their responses in the game, which can provide diagnostically meaningful insights and guide treatment.Google Scholar
Parents Helping Parents: Online resources per local areaGoogle Scholar
We Do Listen.org: Howard B. Wigglebottom educational books, animations, songs, lessons, and gamesGoogle Scholar
Chansky, R. Freeing your child from anxiety: Practical strategies to overcome fears, worries, and phobias and be prepared for life – From toddlers to teens.Google Scholar
Chansky, T. E. Freeing your child from negative thinking: Powerful, practical strategies to build a lifetime of resilience, flexibility, and happiness.Google Scholar
Rapee, R. Helping your anxious child: A step-by-step guide for parents.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

Bunge, E. L., Mandil, J., Consoli, A. J., & Gomar, M. (2017). CBT strategies for anxious and depressed children and adolescents: A clinician’s toolkit. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Friedberg, R. D., McClure, J. M., & Garcia, J. H. (2009). Cognitive therapy techniques for children and adolescents: Tools for enhancing practice. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C. (2017). Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice (3rd ed.). Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Sburlati, E. S., Lyneham, H. J., Schniering, C. A., & Rapee, R. M. (2014). Evidence-based CBT for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents: A competencies based approach. Wiley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weisz, J. R., & Kazdin, A. E. (2017). Evidence-based psychotherapies for children and adolescents (3rd ed.). Guilford Press.Google ScholarPubMed
Chorpita, B. F. (2006). Modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Cook, J. (2012). Wilma Jean the Worry Machine. Illustrated edition. National Center for Youth Issues.Google Scholar
Huebner, D. (2005). What to do when you worry too much: A kid’s guide to overcoming anxiety. Magination Press.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C., & Hedtke, K. A. (2006). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxious children: Therapist manual (3rd ed.). Workbook Pub.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C., & Hedtke, K. A. (2006). Coping cat workbook (2nd ed.). Workbook Pub.Google Scholar
Karst, P., & Stevenson, G. (2000). The Invisible String. Little, Brown.Google Scholar
Young, K. (2016). Hey Warrior! Little Steps Publishing.Google Scholar
Karst, P., & Stevenson, G. (2000). The Invisible String. Little, Brown.Google Scholar
Young, K. (2016). Hey Warrior! Little Steps Publishing.Google Scholar
Kennard, B. D., Hughes, J. L., & Foxwell, A. A. (2016). CBT for depression in children and adolescents: A guide to relapse prevention. Routledge.Google Scholar
Sullivan, L. (2013). How to get unstuck from the negative muck: A kid’s guide to getting rid of negative thinking. SOLNA Investments.Google Scholar
Temple, S. (1997). Brief therapy for adolescent depression (Practitioner’s resource series). Professional Resource Exchange.Google Scholar
Wilkes, T. C. R., Belsher, G., Rush, A. J., Frank, E., & Beck, A. T. (1994). Cognitive therapy for depressed adolescents. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Williams, K. N., & Crandal, B. R. (2015). Modular CBT for children and adolescents with depression: A clinician’s guide to individualized treatment. Harbinger.Google Scholar
The Ungame (All Ages, Families Version, Kids Version, and Teens Version): Ice-breaking style card game to help elicit getting to know the client, develop rapport, and process different topics (e.g., different emotions, scenarios, reflection on experiences).Google Scholar
Feelings in a Jar: Jar full of 365 cards with feeling words that can be processed and explored, or used in various games (e.g., acting out the emotions).Google Scholar
Teen Talk in a Jar: Jar full of thought-provoking questions to generate conversations with teenagers. Can be used at home at the dinner table or in group therapy with teens.Google Scholar
What If? In a Jar: Questions and Dilemmas to Get Kids Thinking about Choices: Cards in a jar with “what if” prompts for kids to explore decision-making regarding developmentally appropriate scenarios. Help prep kids to explore future scenarios and how best to cope.Google Scholar
Feelings Playing Cards: Playing cards with a variety of different emotions and corresponding faces. Can be used to play general card games and/or discuss and teach about different emotions.Google Scholar
The Talking, Feeling & Doing Game: Board game that explores talking, feeling, and doing cards that range from not-anxiety-provoking (e.g., What is your name?) to more anxiety-provoking (e.g., processing challenging situations). The game is aimed at gaining insight into the psychological issues most important at the time to the child based on their responses in the game, which can provide diagnostically meaningful insights and guide treatment.Google Scholar
Parents Helping Parents: Online resources per local areaGoogle Scholar
We Do Listen.org: Howard B. Wigglebottom educational books, animations, songs, lessons, and gamesGoogle Scholar
Chansky, R. Freeing your child from anxiety: Practical strategies to overcome fears, worries, and phobias and be prepared for life – From toddlers to teens.Google Scholar
Chansky, T. E. Freeing your child from negative thinking: Powerful, practical strategies to build a lifetime of resilience, flexibility, and happiness.Google Scholar
Rapee, R. Helping your anxious child: A step-by-step guide for parents.Google Scholar
Bunge, E. L., Mandil, J., Consoli, A. J., & Gomar, M. (2017). CBT strategies for anxious and depressed children and adolescents: A clinician’s toolkit. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Friedberg, R. D., McClure, J. M., & Garcia, J. H. (2009). Cognitive therapy techniques for children and adolescents: Tools for enhancing practice. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C. (2017). Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents: A casebook for clinical practice (3rd ed.). Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Sburlati, E. S., Lyneham, H. J., Schniering, C. A., & Rapee, R. M. (2014). Evidence-based CBT for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents: A competencies based approach. Wiley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weisz, J. R., & Kazdin, A. E. (2017). Evidence-based psychotherapies for children and adolescents (3rd ed.). Guilford Press.Google ScholarPubMed
Chorpita, B. F. (2006). Modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Cook, J. (2012). Wilma Jean the Worry Machine. Illustrated edition. National Center for Youth Issues.Google Scholar
Huebner, D. (2005). What to do when you worry too much: A kid’s guide to overcoming anxiety. Magination Press.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C., & Hedtke, K. A. (2006). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxious children: Therapist manual (3rd ed.). Workbook Pub.Google Scholar
Kendall, P. C., & Hedtke, K. A. (2006). Coping cat workbook (2nd ed.). Workbook Pub.Google Scholar
Karst, P., & Stevenson, G. (2000). The Invisible String. Little, Brown.Google Scholar
Young, K. (2016). Hey Warrior! Little Steps Publishing.Google Scholar
Karst, P., & Stevenson, G. (2000). The Invisible String. Little, Brown.Google Scholar
Young, K. (2016). Hey Warrior! Little Steps Publishing.Google Scholar
Kennard, B. D., Hughes, J. L., & Foxwell, A. A. (2016). CBT for depression in children and adolescents: A guide to relapse prevention. Routledge.Google Scholar
Sullivan, L. (2013). How to get unstuck from the negative muck: A kid’s guide to getting rid of negative thinking. SOLNA Investments.Google Scholar
Temple, S. (1997). Brief therapy for adolescent depression (Practitioner’s resource series). Professional Resource Exchange.Google Scholar
Wilkes, T. C. R., Belsher, G., Rush, A. J., Frank, E., & Beck, A. T. (1994). Cognitive therapy for depressed adolescents. Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Williams, K. N., & Crandal, B. R. (2015). Modular CBT for children and adolescents with depression: A clinician’s guide to individualized treatment. Harbinger.Google Scholar
The Ungame (All Ages, Families Version, Kids Version, and Teens Version): Ice-breaking style card game to help elicit getting to know the client, develop rapport, and process different topics (e.g., different emotions, scenarios, reflection on experiences).Google Scholar
Feelings in a Jar: Jar full of 365 cards with feeling words that can be processed and explored, or used in various games (e.g., acting out the emotions).Google Scholar
Teen Talk in a Jar: Jar full of thought-provoking questions to generate conversations with teenagers. Can be used at home at the dinner table or in group therapy with teens.Google Scholar
What If? In a Jar: Questions and Dilemmas to Get Kids Thinking about Choices: Cards in a jar with “what if” prompts for kids to explore decision-making regarding developmentally appropriate scenarios. Help prep kids to explore future scenarios and how best to cope.Google Scholar
Feelings Playing Cards: Playing cards with a variety of different emotions and corresponding faces. Can be used to play general card games and/or discuss and teach about different emotions.Google Scholar
The Talking, Feeling & Doing Game: Board game that explores talking, feeling, and doing cards that range from not-anxiety-provoking (e.g., What is your name?) to more anxiety-provoking (e.g., processing challenging situations). The game is aimed at gaining insight into the psychological issues most important at the time to the child based on their responses in the game, which can provide diagnostically meaningful insights and guide treatment.Google Scholar
Parents Helping Parents: Online resources per local areaGoogle Scholar
We Do Listen.org: Howard B. Wigglebottom educational books, animations, songs, lessons, and gamesGoogle Scholar
Chansky, R. Freeing your child from anxiety: Practical strategies to overcome fears, worries, and phobias and be prepared for life – From toddlers to teens.Google Scholar
Chansky, T. E. Freeing your child from negative thinking: Powerful, practical strategies to build a lifetime of resilience, flexibility, and happiness.Google Scholar
Rapee, R. Helping your anxious child: A step-by-step guide for parents.Google Scholar
Karst, P., & Stevenson, G. (2000). The Invisible String. Little, Brown.Google Scholar
Young, K. (2016). Hey Warrior! Little Steps Publishing.Google Scholar

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