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2 - The History and Philosophical Underpinnings of CBT:

The State of the Art

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2022

Gillian Todd
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia
Rhena Branch
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia
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Summary

This chapter discusses the philosophical and historical underpinnings of CBT. Attention is given to how CBT and REBT developed, and how these differ in terms of points of theory and intervention. Concepts such as ‘perfectionism’, ‘intolerance of uncertainty’, and ‘self-compassion’ are discussed regarding possible commonalities these approaches share with ideas posited by early theorists. Specific attention is given to Ellis’s ABC model of personality and how it is currently utilized within CBT. Recent developments within CBT such as ACT are included. Protocol-driven CBT and the possible implications for quality of CBT training (e.g., Improving Access to Psychological Treatments, UK training courses) are included.

Type
Chapter
Information
Evidence-Based Treatment for Anxiety Disorders and Depression
A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Compendium
, pp. 6 - 26
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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