Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4k54s Total loading time: 0.256 Render date: 2021-11-28T12:48:38.316Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2013

Anne Andermann
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Get access

Summary

The purpose of this book is to better understand how to improve the health of individuals, populations and the global community. What are the major threats to health? What are the causes of poor health? What works to improve health? How do we know that it works? What are the barriers to implementation? What are the measures of success? These are some of the key questions that will be addressed in this book. The aim is to provide health practitioners and policy-makers with a broad overview of how to improve health and reduce health inequities, as well as the tools to make more evidence-informed decisions that will have a positive influence on health.

Indeed, countless decisions that affect health are made every day, whether at the level of individual health choices made by patients and the general public, population health policies and programmes made by politicians and public health officials, or global health strategies and recommendations made by an increasing number of players at the international level, including civil servants, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), philanthropists, academics, public–private partnerships and so forth. For instance, a mother takes time off from work to bring her child to the local clinic to be vaccinated. A student buys a fruit for an afternoon snack rather than potato chips. A 28-year-old woman who carries the BRCA gene for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer undergoes preventive surgery to remove her breasts and ovaries. A government passes a bill to extend parental leave to one year and to increase funding for early childhood development programmes. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends increasing universal health coverage and social protection by strengthening primary health care as the foundation for all health systems. In each of the above examples, people were faced with a choice (i.e. to vaccinate or not, to eat a fruit or chips, to have preventive surgery or enhanced screening, to finance social programmes or reduce taxes, to promote vertical programming that focuses on preventing and treating a single disease or a more comprehensive approach based on primary health care), and a decision was made that will either improve or impair health outcomes.

Type
Chapter
Information
Evidence for Health
From Patient Choice to Global Policy
, pp. 1 - 4
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Rose, G. Rose’s Strategy of Preventive Medicine. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Introduction
  • Anne Andermann, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Evidence for Health
  • Online publication: 05 February 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511895524.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Introduction
  • Anne Andermann, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Evidence for Health
  • Online publication: 05 February 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511895524.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Anne Andermann, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Evidence for Health
  • Online publication: 05 February 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511895524.005
Available formats
×