Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-rn2sj Total loading time: 0.496 Render date: 2022-08-15T01:50:23.092Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

5 - EU citizenship after Lisbon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Diamond Ashiagbor
Affiliation:
University of London
Nicola Countouris
Affiliation:
University College London
Ioannis Lianos
Affiliation:
University College London
Get access

Summary

Introduction

EU citizenship, so far at least, has been mostly effective as a legal construct. Its substance has emerged primarily through case law on the rights to free movement and residence, much of which has been codified in Directive 2004/38. The other Treaty provisions linked expressly to EU citizenship outline a number of political rights, including municipal and European Parliament electoral rights.

The Lisbon Treaty did not engage radically with these formal aspects of EU citizenship. There has been some restructuring to create what is now Part Two of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), making an express linkage between the prohibition on nationality discrimination, action to combat other forms of discrimination, and the primary rights of EU citizenship. In most substantive respects, the Treaty rights already attached to EU citizenship are reproduced in Articles 20–25 TFEU, although there are some innovations too. The first part of this chapter goes through relevant Treaty on European Union (TEU) and Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) provisions and outlines any changes effected through the adoption of the Lisbon Treaty.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

2006
Craig, P.The Treaty of Lisbon: Process, architecture and substance’ 2008 33 ELRevGoogle Scholar
Dougan, M.The Treaty of Lisbon 2007: Winning minds, not hearts’ 2008 45 CMLRevGoogle Scholar
Schrauwen, A.European Union citizenship in the Treaty of Lisbon: Any change at all? 2008 15 MJGoogle Scholar
Shaw, J.The constitutional development of citizenship in the EU context: with or without the Treaty of Lisbon’Ceci n'est pas une Constitution: Constitutionalisation without a ConstitutionNomos 2009Google Scholar
Lopez, V. CuestaThe Lisbon Treaty's provisions on democratic principles: A legal framework for participatory democracy’ 2010 16 EPLGoogle Scholar
2008
Kostakopoulou, DIdeas, Norms and European Citizenship: Explaining Institutional Change’ 2005 68 MLRCrossRefGoogle Scholar
2010
2011
2002
2006
Shaw, J.Citizenship: Contrasting dynamics at the interface of integration and constitutionalism’The Evolution of EU LawOxford University Press 2010Google Scholar
2001
1988
2002
2006
Cases, Joined 2007
1993
White, R.C.AFree movement, equal treatment, and citizenship of the Union’ 2005 54 ICLQCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spaventa, E.Seeing the wood despite the trees? On the scope of Union citizenship and its constitutional effects’ 2008 45 CMLRevGoogle Scholar
Tryfonidou, A.Reverse Discrimination in EC LawKluwer Law International 2009Google Scholar
2008
2008
Jacobs, F.G. and the protection of fundamental rights in EC law’The Past and Future of EU Law: The Classics of EU Law Revisited on the 50th Anniversary of the Rome TreatyHart Publishing 2010Google Scholar
2007
Azoulai, L.The Court of Justice and the social market economy: The emergence of an ideal and the conditions for its realization’ 2008 45 CMLRevGoogle Scholar
Barnard, C.Social dumping or dumping socialism’ 2008 67 CLJCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kilpatrick, C.'s regulatory conundrum: collective standard-setting and the Court's new approach to posted workers’ 2009 34 ELRevGoogle Scholar
Syrpis, P.Novitz, T.Economic and social rights in conflict: political and judicial approaches to their reconciliation’ 2008 33 ELRevGoogle Scholar
2006
Snell, J.The notion of market access: A concept or a slogan 2010 47 CMLRevGoogle Scholar
Barnard, C.Fitting the remaining pieces into the goods and persons jigsaw 2001 26 ELRevGoogle Scholar
Tryfonidou, A.Further steps on the road to convergence among the market freedoms’ 2010 35 ELRevGoogle Scholar
Tryfonidou, A.In search of the aim of the EC free movement of persons provisions: Has the Court of Justice missed the point? 2009 46 CMLRevGoogle Scholar
Shuibhne, N. NicThe outer limits of EU citizenship: Displacing economic free movement rightsThe Outer Limits of European Union LawHart Publishing 2009Google Scholar
1993
Spaventa, E.Leaving behind? The free movement of goods after the rulings in and ’ 2009 34 ELRevGoogle Scholar
2003
2006
1998
2010
2009
Oliver, P.Enchelmaier, S.Free movement of goods: Recent developments in the case law’ 2007 44 CMLRevGoogle Scholar
2006
2006
Shuibhne, N. NicGormley, L.From Single Market to Economic Union: Essays in honour of John A. UsherOxford University PressCrossRef
O’Leary, S.
Commission, European 2001
2004
2008
2008
Monti, M.A New Strategy for the Single Market: At the service of Europe's Economy and Society 2010
2010
2010 2010

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×