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Part I - Characterizing the Interface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2017

Kerry M. Dore
Affiliation:
University of Texas, San Antonio
Erin P. Riley
Affiliation:
San Diego State University
Agustín Fuentes
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
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Ethnoprimatology
A Practical Guide to Research at the Human-Nonhuman Primate Interface
, pp. 7 - 168
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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