Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-66nw2 Total loading time: 0.204 Render date: 2021-11-30T04:24:07.280Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - Race and Ethnic Inequality in Educational Attainment in the United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2014

Marta Tienda
Affiliation:
Princeton University, New Jersey
Charles Hirschman
Affiliation:
University of Washington
Jennifer C. Lee
Affiliation:
University of California
Michael Rutter
Affiliation:
King's College London
Get access

Summary

Introduction

In the United States, as in other modern industrial societies, education is the primary gateway to socioeconomic attainment. The single most important predictor of good jobs and high income is higher education. College graduates have average earnings 70 percent higher than those of high school graduates (Day & Newburger, 2002). With such wide differences in economic outcomes between the education haves and have-nots, most research on economic inequality and the process of social stratification must begin with the determinants of schooling, and in particular, on the transition from high school to college.

Equality of opportunity, which lies at the heart of the American dream of a meritocratic society, is still a distant goal. The fundamental, and inescapable, reality is that families work to subvert equality of opportunity. All parents, or at least most parents, want their children to do well and invest considerable resources and time to sponsor, prod, push, and cajole their offspring. Parents provide economic and social support as well as encouragement to further their children's schooling and subsequent occupational and economic attainment. Not all parents, however, have equal capacity and ability in this role. Inequalities of wealth, income, and other family resources certainly make a difference, and more subtle attributes, such as family cultures, child-rearing patterns, and social networks, may also influence the future career paths of children.

Families are not the only influence on the educational and socioeconomic attainment of children.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
6
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×