Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-cxxrm Total loading time: 0.26 Render date: 2021-12-01T11:49:17.076Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

2 - Growing Up Ethnic in the United Kingdom and the United States: Comparative Contexts for Youth Development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2014

Marta Tienda
Affiliation:
Princeton University, New Jersey
Marta Tienda
Affiliation:
Princeton University, New Jersey
Michael Rutter
Affiliation:
King's College London
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Understanding whether and how group membership influences adolescent behavior and a myriad of outcomes requires an appreciation of the social and economic arrangements in which youth forge their transition to adulthood. Because several chapters that follow involve paired comparisons of youth experiences in the United Kingdom and the United States, this chapter situates them in context by sketching a socio-demographic overview of youth in both countries. First, I provide the demographic sketch of both countries, focusing on how migration altered their ethnoracial landscapes. Subsequently, I characterize the current social and economic conditions of immigrant and minority youth, offering temporal perspectives as data permit.

This enterprise presumes the availability of comparable data over time, but this mere condition is seldom met. Not only do official classification systems evolve, but so also do the methods for collecting migration status and ethno-racial group membership. I briefly acknowledge these limitations and, perforce, limit cross-country comparisons to general overviews based on social and demographic indicators. To capitalize on the nuances of country-specific data, the social conditions of immigrant and minority youth are profiled separately, reserving for the conclusion a synthesis of key differences and similarities. My use of the phrase immigrant and minority youth is deliberate, to acknowledge that not all immigrant youth are members of minority populations and that groups designated as minorities are not necessarily foreign-born (although their parents or distant ancestors may be immigrants).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
2
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×