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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 September 2009

Stuart Currie
Affiliation:
Leeds & West Yorkshire Radiology Academy
Steven Kennish
Affiliation:
Leeds & West Yorkshire Radiology Academy
Karen Flood
Affiliation:
Leeds & West Yorkshire Radiology Academy
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Summary

Nearly all surgical patients undergo some form of radiological imaging as part of their diagnostic work-up. It is often the role of the surgical trainee to clerk and examine the patient, and initiate emergent treatment and investigations in the acute setting. A basic understanding of the role of imaging and its demonstration of relevant anatomy is a fundamental prerequisite to the appropriate utilization of the radiological armamentarium.

Surgical trainees are not expected to interpret imaging to the point of issuing a report; this is the role of the radiologist. Sound knowledge of radiological anatomy can prove invaluable however in the initial reviewing of plain films, and give the surgeon a more informed opinion in the radiological multi-disciplinary meeting.

Over recent years the Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS) viva examination has increasingly made use of radiological imaging to facilitate the discussion of anatomy relevant to every day surgical practice. Indeed, the authors were questioned on sagittal magnetic resonance images of the brain, male and female pelvis and radiographs of the chest and abdomen.

For many, examinations are stressful. The last thing a candidate needs is to be faced with unfamiliar radiological images. This review of surgically relevant radiological imaging aims to prevent initial uncertainties, and should allow the candidate to rapidly progress to confidently discussing the anatomy and scoring valuable points.

This book aims to provide you with a number of key advantages before entering the exam.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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