Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-x5mqb Total loading time: 0.19 Render date: 2021-12-07T01:23:17.334Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - The Level-Headed Approach on Errors and Mistakes in Dutch Child Protection: An Individual Duty or a Shared Responsibility?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 March 2021

Judith Masson
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Nigel Parton
Affiliation:
University of Huddersfield
Tarja Pösö
Affiliation:
University of Tampere, Finland
Get access

Summary

Child protection in the Netherlands

Dutch child protection is a family-oriented system (Gilbert et al, 2011), characterised by the recognition of the best interest of the child and a family-friendly approach with an emphasis on supporting families rather than intervening and reporting child abuse (Knijn and Nijnatten, 2011). Child protection policy developments in the Netherlands have been highly influenced by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the European Convention on Human Rights. All families must have access to parenting support and family coaching in their municipalities, and great efforts are made to prevent child abuse and neglect, and to detect it at an early stage. Out-of-home placement of a child is considered a last-resort intervention and should be temporary (Harder et al, 2013).

The number of children (0–18 years old) in the Netherlands is estimated at 3,429,193 (CBS, 2015). Research on child abuse shows a prevalence rate of 33.8 children per 1,000 (Euser et al, 2013). Although the prevalence rate appeared relatively stable between 2010 and 2015, the number of victims reported has increased by 67 per cent in this five-year period. Likewise, an increased number of child protection orders has been registered (Netherlands Youth Institute, 2007). This growth has been linked to greater social attention to child abuse and the occurrence of fatal cases.

The Dutch child protection system has undergone important structural changes with the introduction of the Youth Act 2015 (Jeugdwet 2015). The main features of this new framework are: the decentralisation of responsibilities for provision and quality of care for children and families to the 393 Dutch municipalities; the aim of reducing the number of children in specialised care by increasing preventive and early intervention measures; and promoting the use of the families’ social networks.

Dutch municipalities are responsible for the identification, investigation, intervention and monitoring of child abuse cases. The two key child protection institutions are the Advice and Reporting Centre for Domestic Violence and Child Maltreatment (Advies-en Meldpunt Huiselijk Geweld en Kindermishandeling – AMHK), and the Child Care and Protection Board (Raad voor de Kinderbescherming – RvdK). After a report, the AMHK can investigate a possible situation of child abuse and refer children to voluntary care. The RvdK and the Juvenile Court are involved in investigating and deciding whether compulsory child protection measures are necessary.

Type
Chapter
Information
Errors and Mistakes in Child Protection
International Discourses, Approaches and Strategies
, pp. 75 - 94
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×