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6 - The Semantics–Pragmatics Interface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 November 2019

Istvan Kecskes
Affiliation:
State University of New York, Albany
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Summary

The chapter examines the semantics–pragmatics division from the perspective of ELF communication and points out a clear dominance of semantics. The linguistic code works like common ground for ELF users and utterance production is governed by semantic analyzability. The standard pragmatic model seems to be working better in intercultural interactions than in L1 interaction based on which it was originally developed. In ELF production, speakers compose their utterances relying on the literal meaning of words rather than using figurative and formulaic language. The pragmatisized semantics that ELF interlocutors use in interactions is the result of blending their dictionary knowledge of the linguistic code (semantics) with their basic interpersonal communicative skills and sometimes unusual, not target language-based pragmatic strategies that suit them very well in their attempt to achieve their communicative goals.

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Chapter
Information
English as a Lingua Franca
The Pragmatic Perspective
, pp. 137 - 158
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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