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11 - Morphosyntactic Variation in Spanish

Global and American Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2021

Danae Perez
Affiliation:
University of Zurich
Marianne Hundt
Affiliation:
University of Zurich
Johannes Kabatek
Affiliation:
University of Zurich
Daniel Schreier
Affiliation:
University of Zurich
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Summary

This chapter models structural variation among Spanish varieties with a special focus on Latin America. Based on a database built on secondary sources, the author analyses structural data from 48 Spanish varieties and contact varieties. The results of the analysis show that contact influence is reflected in the grouping of varieties, especially from a global perspective. Among Latin American varieties, regional groupings appear, showing also traces of contact for individual varieties and the influence of national standards. The results reflect previous classifications of Spanish varieties, and show the usefulness of computational methods in comparative studies of global Spanish variation.

Type
Chapter
Information
English and Spanish
World Languages in Interaction
, pp. 209 - 232
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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