Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-4nk8m Total loading time: 0.223 Render date: 2021-10-17T06:03:31.244Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - Energy sector reform and liberalization: case studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2012

Get access

Summary

Introduction

In the 1990s many developing countries faced with the inefficiencies of public sector energy enterprises and the adverse impact of increasing energy subsidies on their budget, embarked upon an extensive program of energy sector reform within the framework of macroeconomic reform and liberalization. Developing countries expected that the reforming of the energy sector by reversing the pre-1990s command and control strategy of monopoly of public energy enterprises would promote competition, improve energy enterprise efficiency and attract private investment to increase energy supplies for development. While the number of countries on the reform path increased in the 1990s, not all of them were equally successful. At one end of the reform spectrum, countries such as China and Argentina were considered to be successful reformers. Democratic Argentina, embracing a US style free market was considered (until the economic crisis that started in 2001) to have successfully completed its energy sector reform and was put forward as a model and the best practice to other developing countries embarking on a similar reform process in the 1990s. Other countries in East Asia seemed to be succeeding until before the 1998 crisis and are now trying to get back into the reform process. Many other countries at the other end of the spectrum in SSA burdened by economic and political difficulties continue to struggle along with little success.

As discussed in Chapter 4, the review of energy sector reform and liberalization in developing countries shows mixed performances with interregional and inter-energy sub-sector variations.

Type
Chapter
Information
Energy for Development
Twenty-first Century Challenges of Reform and Liberalization in Developing Countries
, pp. 127 - 340
Publisher: Anthem Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×