Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-7xspw Total loading time: 0.532 Render date: 2022-10-06T05:25:38.223Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue false

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2020

Hicham Bou Nassif
Affiliation:
Claremont McKenna College, California
Get access

Summary

The 2011 uprisings in the Arab world shared similar characteristics and produced radically divergent outcomes. The tens of thousands of protesters who took to the streets in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, and Syria clamored nonviolently for regime change. The urban poor, Westernized elite, Islamists, union activists, liberals, and leftists mobilized along cross-class, cross-regional, and nonpartisan lines. The commonalities in terms of motivations, grievances, protest size, as well as the peaceful nature of the popular mobilization, were unmistakable. And yet the popular movements triggered markedly different military responses. In Syria and Bahrain, the armed forces sanctioned bloodbaths to defend their leaders. In contrast, the military refrained from using violence in Egypt and Tunisia. Meanwhile, troops splintered in Libya and Yemen where some units defected wholesale whereas others stayed loyal and willing to uphold autocracy.

Type
Chapter
Information
Endgames
Military Response to Protest in Arab Autocracies
, pp. 1 - 24
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Introduction
  • Hicham Bou Nassif, Claremont McKenna College, California
  • Book: Endgames
  • Online publication: 15 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108893695.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Introduction
  • Hicham Bou Nassif, Claremont McKenna College, California
  • Book: Endgames
  • Online publication: 15 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108893695.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Hicham Bou Nassif, Claremont McKenna College, California
  • Book: Endgames
  • Online publication: 15 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108893695.001
Available formats
×