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Conclusions

from Part III - Britain, the Cape Colony, West Africa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 December 2022

Elizabeth Elbourne
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
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Summary

This book has focused on the relationship between family biopower and empire. It has made the argument that kinship strategies were used by some Indigenous people to try to manage empire, even as imperial power often flowed through elite families. By the 1840s, settler democracy and the growth of settler nations increasingly challenged these forms of power as a mode of governance, despite the continuing power of wealthy families. This concluding discussion uses the example of the failure of the Niger expedition and the colonial buy-out of Indigenous lands in Upper Canada with the Act of Union to illustrate the turn to the settler nation, and the entrenchment of new kinship strategies, focused on the white family of the nation rather than kinship ties between settlers and Indigenous peoples. It also argues that moral colonialism was firmly entrenched as a response to colonial violence and that this vision in itself would become an important justification for the rise of the British empire to world hegemony.

Type
Chapter
Information
Empire, Kinship and Violence
Family Histories, Indigenous Rights and the Making of Settler Colonialism, 1770-1842
, pp. 372 - 378
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Conclusions
  • Elizabeth Elbourne, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Empire, Kinship and Violence
  • Online publication: 15 December 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108782791.014
Available formats
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  • Conclusions
  • Elizabeth Elbourne, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Empire, Kinship and Violence
  • Online publication: 15 December 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108782791.014
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusions
  • Elizabeth Elbourne, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Empire, Kinship and Violence
  • Online publication: 15 December 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108782791.014
Available formats
×