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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 December 2022

Elizabeth Elbourne
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
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Chapter
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Empire, Kinship and Violence
Family Histories, Indigenous Rights and the Making of Settler Colonialism, 1770-1842
, pp. 379 - 411
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

Primary Sources

Secondary Sources

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Anon, . Ne yakawea yondereanayendaghkwa oghseragwegouh, neoni yakawea ne orighwadogeaghty yondatnekosseraghs […]. London: Karistodarho C. Buckton, 1787.Google Scholar
Anon, . (ed.) Letters and Extracts of Letters, from Settlers at the Swan River, and in the United States, to Their Friends in the Western Part of Sussex. Petworth, Sussex: John Philips, 1832.Google Scholar
Anon, . Review of John Howison, Sketches of Upper Canada: Domestic, Local and Characteristic, Edinburgh Review, June 1822, no. 37, 249269.Google Scholar
Anon, . Review of Sketches of Plans, 2nd ed., The Monthly Review; or Literary Journal, Enlarged: From January to April Inclusive. London: A. & R. Spottiswoode, 1823, 250253.Google Scholar
Austin, S.Anna Gurney.” Literary Gazette, 4 July 1857, 638639.Google Scholar
Bannister, John William [and Saxe Bannister]. On Emigration to Upper Canada by the late John William Bannister, Esq, Rice Lake, Upper Canada. A new edition: with additions on Nova Scotia; the Cape of Good Hope; New South Wales; Van Diemen’s Land; and the Swan River. London: Joseph Cross, 1831.Google Scholar
[Bannister, John William], Sketches of Plans for Settling in Upper Canada, a Portion of the Unemployed Labourers of Great Britain and Ireland. First edition: London: J. Harding, 1821.Google Scholar
[Bannister, John William], Sketches of Plans for Settling in Upper Canada, a Portion of the Unemployed Labourers of Great Britain and Ireland. Second edition: London: J. Harding, 1822.,Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. “Appendix to a chapter in an octogenarian lawyer’s life”. Printed for the author, 1873.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. British Colonization and Coloured Tribes. London: William Ball, 1838.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. The Classical Sources of the History of the British Isles. London: Longman, Green, Brown and Longmans, 1846.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Colonial Reform: Its Prospects, Means and Principles. A Letter to the Right Hon. William Ewart Gladstone, Her Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies. London: Ward & Co., 1846.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Humane Policy, or Justice to the Aborigines of New Settlements Essential to a Due Expenditure of British Money, and to the Best Interests of the Settlers. London: T.G. Underwood, 1830.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Memoir Respecting the Colonization of Natal in South-Eastern Africa. London: John W. Parker, 1839.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Memoir upon the Improvement of the Sheep and Goats of Italy, by Good Government and Judicious Measures. London: Richardson & Co, 1861.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Mr. Bannister’s Claims. London: Vizetelly and Company, 1853.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Remarks on the Indians of North America, in a letter to an Edinburgh Reviewer. London: Thomas and George Underwood, 1822.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Statements and Documents Relating to Proceedings in New South Wales in 1824, 1825 and 1826, Intended in support of an appeal to the King by the Attorney General of the Colony. Cape Town: W. Bridekirk, Heerengracht 1827.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. William Paterson: The Merchant Statesman and Founder of the Bank of England: His Life and Trials. Edinburgh: William P. Nimmo, 1868.Google Scholar
Bannister, Thomas. A Letter on Colonial Labour, and On the Sale of Lands on Austral-Asia, by Thomas Bannister. Hobart Town: N. Olding, [1833].Google Scholar
Bannister, Thomas. A Report of Captain Bannister’s journey to King George’s Sound overland February 5th 1831, reproduced in Shoobert, Joanne et al. (eds),Western Australian Exploration 1826–1835. Perth: Hesperian Press, 2005.Google Scholar
Batman, John. The Settlement of John Batman in Port Philip: from his own journal. Melbourne: George Slater, 1856.Google Scholar
Boswell, James. “An Account of the Chief of the Mohock Indians who lately visited England”. London Magazine, 1 July 1776, 339.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. Accounts and Papers, 7, Relating to customs and excise, imports and exports, shipping and trade, Session 6 December 1831–16 August 1832, vol. XXXIV, 399.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. House of Commons Sessional Papers, 1819 (547): Second Report of the Commissioners Appointed in pursuance of an Act of the 58th Year of His present Majest, cap.9, intituled An Act for appointing Commissioners to enquire concerning Charities in England for the Education of the Poor.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. Journals of the House of Lords, 3 George 5, 5 March 1765; 6 March 1765.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers, Papers Relative to the Condition and Treatment of the Native Inhabitants of Southern Africa, within the colony of the Cape of Good Hope, or beyond the frontiers of that colony. Part 1: Hottentots and Bosjesmen; Caffres; Griquas London: House of Commons, 1835.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. Report of the Select Committee on Aborigines (British Settlements), vol. 1, 538, 5 August 1836.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. Report of the Select Committee on Aborigines (British Settlements), vol. 2, 425, 26 June 1837.Google Scholar
Buxton, Charles. Memoirs of Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, edited by his son. London: John Murray, 1855.Google Scholar
Buxton, Thomas Fowell, The African Slave Trade and Its Remedy. London: J. Murray, 1840.Google Scholar
Campbell, Patrick. Travels in the Interior of the Uninhabited Parts of North America in the Years 1791 and 1792(Edinburgh, n.d.).Google Scholar
Campbell, William W. Annals of Tryon County; or, The border warfare of New York during the Revolution. London: J. & J. Harper, 1831.Google Scholar
Cave, Eleanor. “‘Journal During the Expedition Against the Blacks’: Robert Lawrence's experience on the Black Line”, Journal of Australian Studies, 37(1), 2013, 3447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Claus, Daniel. Daniel Claus’ Narrative of His Relations with Sir William Johnson and Experiences in the Lake George Fight. Printed for the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York, 1904.Google Scholar
Cook, Frederick (ed.). Journals of the Military Expedition of Major General John Sullivan against the Six Nations. Auburn, New York: Knapp, Peck, Thomson, 1887.Google Scholar
[Crowther, Samuel]. “Narrative of events in the life of a Liberated Negro, Now a Church Missionary Catechist in Sierra Leone”. Missionary Register, October 1837, 433–440.Google Scholar
Drew, Benjamin. A North-Side View of Slavery. The Refugee: or, the Narratives of Fugitive Slaves in Canada. Boston: John P. Jewett and Company, 1856.Google Scholar
Foreign Office (Great Britain), British and Foreign State Papers, vol. XVI, 18281829. London: James Ridgway, 1832.Google Scholar
Frey, Samuel Ludlow (ed.). The Minute Book of the Committee of Safety of Tryon County, the Old New York Frontier. New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1905.Google Scholar
Galt, John. Autobiography of John Galt. 2 vols. Boston: Allen & Ticknor, 1834.Google Scholar
Gourlay, Robert. An Appeal to the Common Sense, Mind and Manhood of the British Nation. London: printed for the author and sold by Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper, 1826.Google Scholar
Gourlay, Robert. A Statistical Account of Upper Canada in 1819 With a View to a Grand System of Emigration. 2 vols. London: Simpkin and Marshall, 1822.Google Scholar
Grant, Peter Warden. Considerations on the State of the Colonial Currency and Foreign Exchanges at the Cape of Good Hope. Cape Town: W. Bridekirk, 1825.Google Scholar
Hamilton, Milton W. and Corey, Albert B. (eds). The Papers of Sir William Johnson. 14 vols. Albany: the University of the State of New York, 1921–1965.Google Scholar
Harrison, Samuel Alexander (ed.). Memoir of Lieut Col. Tench Tilghman. Albany, NY: J. Munsell, 1876.Google Scholar
Hutton, C. W. (ed.). The Autobiography of the late Sir Andries Stockenstrom, Bart, Sometime Lieutenant-Governor of the Eastern Province of the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope, 2 vols. Cape Town: J.C. Juta, 1887.Google Scholar
Isaacs, Nathaniel. Travels and Adventures in Eastern Africa. London: E. Churton, 1836.Google Scholar
Jamieson, Robert. An Appeal to the Government and People of Great Britain, against the proposed Niger Expedition: A letter, addressed to the Right Hon Lord John Russell, Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies &c &c &c. London: Smith, Elder & Co, 1840.Google Scholar
Jennings, Francis, Fenton, William N., and Druke, Mary A. (eds), Iroquois Indians: A Documentary History of the Diplomacy of the Six Nations and Their League. Woodbridge, CT: Research Publications, 1985.Google Scholar
Jones, Thomas. History of New York during the Revolutionary War, and of the leading events in the other colonies at that period, ed. de Lancey, Edward Floyd. 2 vols. New York, NY: New York Historical Society, 1879.Google Scholar
Klinck, Carl F. and Talman, James (eds.), with introduction and additional notes to new edition by Carl Benn, The Journal of Major John Norton. Toronto: Champlain Society, 2011.Google Scholar
Lambe, William. Reports of the Effects of a Peculiar Regimen on Scirrhous Tumours and Cancerous Ulcers. London: J. Mawman, 1809.Google Scholar
Lambe, William. Researches in the properties of spring water, with medical cautions […] against the use of lead in the construction of pumps, water-pipes, cisterns […]. London: J. Johnson, 1803.Google Scholar
Locke, John. Second Treatise of Government. Indianapolis and Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company, 1980; first published 1689.Google Scholar
Long, J. Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader. London: printed for the author, 1791.Google Scholar
Mill, John Stuart. The Subjection of Women. London: Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1869.Google Scholar
Moodie, Donald (ed.). The Record: Or, A Series of Official Papers Relative to the Condition and Treatment of the Native Tribes of South Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011; originally published in 1838.Google Scholar
NN [John Strachan], “Life of Captain Brant”, Christian Recorder, May 1819, no. 3, 106–112 and June, 1819, no. 4, 145–151.Google Scholar
Norton, John – Teyoninhokarawen. A Mohawk Memoir from the War of 1812 (introduced, annotated and edited by Carl Benn). Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019.Google Scholar
O’Callaghan, E. B. (ed.). Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York. Albany, NY: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1856, vol. VIII.Google Scholar
Ogden, John C. A Tour through Upper and Lower Canada, 2nd ed. Wilmington, DE: Bonsal and Niles, 1800.Google Scholar
Parker, Arthur C. (ed.). The Code of Handsome Lake, The Seneca Prophet (translated by So-son-da-wa/ Edward Cornplanter). Museum Bulletin 163. Albany, NY: University of the State of New York for the New York State Museum, 1913.Google Scholar
Philip, John. Researches in South Africa. 2 vols. London: James Duncan, 1828.Google Scholar
Pilkington, Walter (ed.). The Journals of Samuel Kirkland, 18th-century Missionary to the Iroquois, Government Agent, Father of Hamilton College. Clinton, NY: Hamilton College, 1980.Google Scholar
Priest, Josiah. The Deeply Interesting Story of General Patchin of Schoharie County Stolen when a Lad by Brant and his Indians. First published Lansingburg: W. Harkness, 1840; reprinted Tarrytown, NY: William Abbatt, 1918, as Extra Number 64 of The Magazine of History with Notes and Queries.Google Scholar
Pringle, Thomas. “The British Government at the Cape of Good Hope – Treatment of the Natives”. The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal. London: S. and R. Bentley, Dorset Street, 1828.Google Scholar
Pringle, Thomas. Narrative of a Residence in South Africa. London: Edward Moxon, 1835.Google Scholar
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Schön, James and Crowther, Samuel. Journals of the Rev, James Frederick Schon and Mr. Samuel Crowther. London: Hatchard and Son, 1842.Google Scholar
Shoobert, Joanne et al (eds). Western Australian Exploration 1826–1835. Perth: Hesperian Press, 2005.Google Scholar
Simms, Jeptha. The Frontiersmen of New York: showing customs of the Indians, vicissitudes of the pioneer white settlers, and border strife in two wars. 2 vols. Albany, NY: G.C. Riggs, 1882–1883.Google Scholar
Simms, Jeptha. History of Schoharie County and Border Wars of New York. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books Inc., 1991, first published 1845.Google Scholar
Simms, Jeptha R. Trappers of New York. Albany: J. Munsell, 1850.Google Scholar
Stephen, George. A Letter to the Rt Hon Lord John Russell &c &c &c in reply to Mr. Jamieson on the Niger Expedition. London: Saunders and Otley, 1840.Google Scholar
Stone, W. L. Life of Joseph Brant- Thayendanegea: including the border wars of the American Revolution and sketches of the Indian campaigns of Generals Harmar, St. Clair and Wayne, 2 vols. New York: Alexander V. Blake, 1838.Google Scholar
Stone, W. L. The Life and Times of Red Jacket or Sa-go-ye-wat-ha. New York and London: Wiley and Putnam, 1841.Google Scholar
Strachan, James. A Visit to the Province of Upper Canada in 1819. Aberdeen: D. Chalmers & Co, 1820.Google Scholar
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Allen, Ethan. A Narrative of Colonel Ethan Allen’s Captivity, 4th ed. Burlington, VT: Chauncey Goodrich, 1846.Google Scholar
Anon [presumed Saxe Bannister]. “J.W. Bannister, Esq.”. In “Biographical Particulars of Celebrated Persons, Lately Deceased”. New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal 27 (December 1829).Google Scholar
Anon, . Ne yakawea yondereanayendaghkwa oghseragwegouh, neoni yakawea ne orighwadogeaghty yondatnekosseraghs […]. London: Karistodarho C. Buckton, 1787.Google Scholar
Anon, . (ed.) Letters and Extracts of Letters, from Settlers at the Swan River, and in the United States, to Their Friends in the Western Part of Sussex. Petworth, Sussex: John Philips, 1832.Google Scholar
Anon, . Review of John Howison, Sketches of Upper Canada: Domestic, Local and Characteristic, Edinburgh Review, June 1822, no. 37, 249269.Google Scholar
Anon, . Review of Sketches of Plans, 2nd ed., The Monthly Review; or Literary Journal, Enlarged: From January to April Inclusive. London: A. & R. Spottiswoode, 1823, 250253.Google Scholar
Austin, S.Anna Gurney.” Literary Gazette, 4 July 1857, 638639.Google Scholar
Bannister, John William [and Saxe Bannister]. On Emigration to Upper Canada by the late John William Bannister, Esq, Rice Lake, Upper Canada. A new edition: with additions on Nova Scotia; the Cape of Good Hope; New South Wales; Van Diemen’s Land; and the Swan River. London: Joseph Cross, 1831.Google Scholar
[Bannister, John William], Sketches of Plans for Settling in Upper Canada, a Portion of the Unemployed Labourers of Great Britain and Ireland. First edition: London: J. Harding, 1821.Google Scholar
[Bannister, John William], Sketches of Plans for Settling in Upper Canada, a Portion of the Unemployed Labourers of Great Britain and Ireland. Second edition: London: J. Harding, 1822.,Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. “Appendix to a chapter in an octogenarian lawyer’s life”. Printed for the author, 1873.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. British Colonization and Coloured Tribes. London: William Ball, 1838.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. The Classical Sources of the History of the British Isles. London: Longman, Green, Brown and Longmans, 1846.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Colonial Reform: Its Prospects, Means and Principles. A Letter to the Right Hon. William Ewart Gladstone, Her Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies. London: Ward & Co., 1846.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Humane Policy, or Justice to the Aborigines of New Settlements Essential to a Due Expenditure of British Money, and to the Best Interests of the Settlers. London: T.G. Underwood, 1830.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Memoir Respecting the Colonization of Natal in South-Eastern Africa. London: John W. Parker, 1839.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Memoir upon the Improvement of the Sheep and Goats of Italy, by Good Government and Judicious Measures. London: Richardson & Co, 1861.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Mr. Bannister’s Claims. London: Vizetelly and Company, 1853.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Remarks on the Indians of North America, in a letter to an Edinburgh Reviewer. London: Thomas and George Underwood, 1822.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. Statements and Documents Relating to Proceedings in New South Wales in 1824, 1825 and 1826, Intended in support of an appeal to the King by the Attorney General of the Colony. Cape Town: W. Bridekirk, Heerengracht 1827.Google Scholar
Bannister, Saxe. William Paterson: The Merchant Statesman and Founder of the Bank of England: His Life and Trials. Edinburgh: William P. Nimmo, 1868.Google Scholar
Bannister, Thomas. A Letter on Colonial Labour, and On the Sale of Lands on Austral-Asia, by Thomas Bannister. Hobart Town: N. Olding, [1833].Google Scholar
Bannister, Thomas. A Report of Captain Bannister’s journey to King George’s Sound overland February 5th 1831, reproduced in Shoobert, Joanne et al. (eds),Western Australian Exploration 1826–1835. Perth: Hesperian Press, 2005.Google Scholar
Batman, John. The Settlement of John Batman in Port Philip: from his own journal. Melbourne: George Slater, 1856.Google Scholar
Boswell, James. “An Account of the Chief of the Mohock Indians who lately visited England”. London Magazine, 1 July 1776, 339.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. Accounts and Papers, 7, Relating to customs and excise, imports and exports, shipping and trade, Session 6 December 1831–16 August 1832, vol. XXXIV, 399.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. House of Commons Sessional Papers, 1819 (547): Second Report of the Commissioners Appointed in pursuance of an Act of the 58th Year of His present Majest, cap.9, intituled An Act for appointing Commissioners to enquire concerning Charities in England for the Education of the Poor.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. Journals of the House of Lords, 3 George 5, 5 March 1765; 6 March 1765.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers, Papers Relative to the Condition and Treatment of the Native Inhabitants of Southern Africa, within the colony of the Cape of Good Hope, or beyond the frontiers of that colony. Part 1: Hottentots and Bosjesmen; Caffres; Griquas London: House of Commons, 1835.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. Report of the Select Committee on Aborigines (British Settlements), vol. 1, 538, 5 August 1836.Google Scholar
British Parliamentary Papers. Report of the Select Committee on Aborigines (British Settlements), vol. 2, 425, 26 June 1837.Google Scholar
Buxton, Charles. Memoirs of Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, edited by his son. London: John Murray, 1855.Google Scholar
Buxton, Thomas Fowell, The African Slave Trade and Its Remedy. London: J. Murray, 1840.Google Scholar
Campbell, Patrick. Travels in the Interior of the Uninhabited Parts of North America in the Years 1791 and 1792(Edinburgh, n.d.).Google Scholar
Campbell, William W. Annals of Tryon County; or, The border warfare of New York during the Revolution. London: J. & J. Harper, 1831.Google Scholar
Cave, Eleanor. “‘Journal During the Expedition Against the Blacks’: Robert Lawrence's experience on the Black Line”, Journal of Australian Studies, 37(1), 2013, 3447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Claus, Daniel. Daniel Claus’ Narrative of His Relations with Sir William Johnson and Experiences in the Lake George Fight. Printed for the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York, 1904.Google Scholar
Cook, Frederick (ed.). Journals of the Military Expedition of Major General John Sullivan against the Six Nations. Auburn, New York: Knapp, Peck, Thomson, 1887.Google Scholar
[Crowther, Samuel]. “Narrative of events in the life of a Liberated Negro, Now a Church Missionary Catechist in Sierra Leone”. Missionary Register, October 1837, 433–440.Google Scholar
Drew, Benjamin. A North-Side View of Slavery. The Refugee: or, the Narratives of Fugitive Slaves in Canada. Boston: John P. Jewett and Company, 1856.Google Scholar
Foreign Office (Great Britain), British and Foreign State Papers, vol. XVI, 18281829. London: James Ridgway, 1832.Google Scholar
Frey, Samuel Ludlow (ed.). The Minute Book of the Committee of Safety of Tryon County, the Old New York Frontier. New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1905.Google Scholar
Galt, John. Autobiography of John Galt. 2 vols. Boston: Allen & Ticknor, 1834.Google Scholar
Gourlay, Robert. An Appeal to the Common Sense, Mind and Manhood of the British Nation. London: printed for the author and sold by Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper, 1826.Google Scholar
Gourlay, Robert. A Statistical Account of Upper Canada in 1819 With a View to a Grand System of Emigration. 2 vols. London: Simpkin and Marshall, 1822.Google Scholar
Grant, Peter Warden. Considerations on the State of the Colonial Currency and Foreign Exchanges at the Cape of Good Hope. Cape Town: W. Bridekirk, 1825.Google Scholar
Hamilton, Milton W. and Corey, Albert B. (eds). The Papers of Sir William Johnson. 14 vols. Albany: the University of the State of New York, 1921–1965.Google Scholar
Harrison, Samuel Alexander (ed.). Memoir of Lieut Col. Tench Tilghman. Albany, NY: J. Munsell, 1876.Google Scholar
Hutton, C. W. (ed.). The Autobiography of the late Sir Andries Stockenstrom, Bart, Sometime Lieutenant-Governor of the Eastern Province of the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope, 2 vols. Cape Town: J.C. Juta, 1887.Google Scholar
Isaacs, Nathaniel. Travels and Adventures in Eastern Africa. London: E. Churton, 1836.Google Scholar
Jamieson, Robert. An Appeal to the Government and People of Great Britain, against the proposed Niger Expedition: A letter, addressed to the Right Hon Lord John Russell, Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies &c &c &c. London: Smith, Elder & Co, 1840.Google Scholar
Jennings, Francis, Fenton, William N., and Druke, Mary A. (eds), Iroquois Indians: A Documentary History of the Diplomacy of the Six Nations and Their League. Woodbridge, CT: Research Publications, 1985.Google Scholar
Jones, Thomas. History of New York during the Revolutionary War, and of the leading events in the other colonies at that period, ed. de Lancey, Edward Floyd. 2 vols. New York, NY: New York Historical Society, 1879.Google Scholar
Klinck, Carl F. and Talman, James (eds.), with introduction and additional notes to new edition by Carl Benn, The Journal of Major John Norton. Toronto: Champlain Society, 2011.Google Scholar
Lambe, William. Reports of the Effects of a Peculiar Regimen on Scirrhous Tumours and Cancerous Ulcers. London: J. Mawman, 1809.Google Scholar
Lambe, William. Researches in the properties of spring water, with medical cautions […] against the use of lead in the construction of pumps, water-pipes, cisterns […]. London: J. Johnson, 1803.Google Scholar
Locke, John. Second Treatise of Government. Indianapolis and Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company, 1980; first published 1689.Google Scholar
Long, J. Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader. London: printed for the author, 1791.Google Scholar
Mill, John Stuart. The Subjection of Women. London: Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1869.Google Scholar
Moodie, Donald (ed.). The Record: Or, A Series of Official Papers Relative to the Condition and Treatment of the Native Tribes of South Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011; originally published in 1838.Google Scholar
NN [John Strachan], “Life of Captain Brant”, Christian Recorder, May 1819, no. 3, 106–112 and June, 1819, no. 4, 145–151.Google Scholar
Norton, John – Teyoninhokarawen. A Mohawk Memoir from the War of 1812 (introduced, annotated and edited by Carl Benn). Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019.Google Scholar
O’Callaghan, E. B. (ed.). Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York. Albany, NY: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1856, vol. VIII.Google Scholar
Ogden, John C. A Tour through Upper and Lower Canada, 2nd ed. Wilmington, DE: Bonsal and Niles, 1800.Google Scholar
Parker, Arthur C. (ed.). The Code of Handsome Lake, The Seneca Prophet (translated by So-son-da-wa/ Edward Cornplanter). Museum Bulletin 163. Albany, NY: University of the State of New York for the New York State Museum, 1913.Google Scholar
Philip, John. Researches in South Africa. 2 vols. London: James Duncan, 1828.Google Scholar
Pilkington, Walter (ed.). The Journals of Samuel Kirkland, 18th-century Missionary to the Iroquois, Government Agent, Father of Hamilton College. Clinton, NY: Hamilton College, 1980.Google Scholar
Priest, Josiah. The Deeply Interesting Story of General Patchin of Schoharie County Stolen when a Lad by Brant and his Indians. First published Lansingburg: W. Harkness, 1840; reprinted Tarrytown, NY: William Abbatt, 1918, as Extra Number 64 of The Magazine of History with Notes and Queries.Google Scholar
Pringle, Thomas. “The British Government at the Cape of Good Hope – Treatment of the Natives”. The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal. London: S. and R. Bentley, Dorset Street, 1828.Google Scholar
Pringle, Thomas. Narrative of a Residence in South Africa. London: Edward Moxon, 1835.Google Scholar
Schoeman, Karel (ed.). Griqua Records: The Philippolis Captaincy, 1825–1861. Cape Town: Van Riebeeck Society, 1996.Google Scholar
Schön, James and Crowther, Samuel. Journals of the Rev, James Frederick Schon and Mr. Samuel Crowther. London: Hatchard and Son, 1842.Google Scholar
Shoobert, Joanne et al (eds). Western Australian Exploration 1826–1835. Perth: Hesperian Press, 2005.Google Scholar
Simms, Jeptha. The Frontiersmen of New York: showing customs of the Indians, vicissitudes of the pioneer white settlers, and border strife in two wars. 2 vols. Albany, NY: G.C. Riggs, 1882–1883.Google Scholar
Simms, Jeptha. History of Schoharie County and Border Wars of New York. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books Inc., 1991, first published 1845.Google Scholar
Simms, Jeptha R. Trappers of New York. Albany: J. Munsell, 1850.Google Scholar
Stephen, George. A Letter to the Rt Hon Lord John Russell &c &c &c in reply to Mr. Jamieson on the Niger Expedition. London: Saunders and Otley, 1840.Google Scholar
Stone, W. L. Life of Joseph Brant- Thayendanegea: including the border wars of the American Revolution and sketches of the Indian campaigns of Generals Harmar, St. Clair and Wayne, 2 vols. New York: Alexander V. Blake, 1838.Google Scholar
Stone, W. L. The Life and Times of Red Jacket or Sa-go-ye-wat-ha. New York and London: Wiley and Putnam, 1841.Google Scholar
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