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2 - All the King’s Men

Kinship and the American Revolution

from Part I - North America

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 December 2022

Elizabeth Elbourne
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
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Summary

This chapter examines the American Revolution in the territory of the Six Nations and in colonial New York as an example of the shift in power to settlers and settler rejection of Indigenous modes of alliance that also typified the expansion of settler colonialism elsewhere. In borderland regions, the American Revolution was also a land war. Ethnic cleansing and warfare broke many of such fragile bonds of kinship (real and fictive) as existed between settlers and Indigenous peoples, even as the metaphor of brotherhood was important to Ranger groups in which Indigenous and settler soldiers fought together. Difference was entrenched through violence. Specific examples of the politics of kinship examined include nineteenth-century settler family stories about warfare, including stories about Joseph Brant, who was often taken as a symbol of settler relationships with the Six Nations; changing practices of captive-taking on the part of the Six Nations; complex relationships between white and Indigenous soldiers; and the breaking of kinship links between the Six Nations themselves, in which the Brants played a significant role.

Type
Chapter
Information
Empire, Kinship and Violence
Family Histories, Indigenous Rights and the Making of Settler Colonialism, 1770-1842
, pp. 70 - 113
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • All the King’s Men
  • Elizabeth Elbourne, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Empire, Kinship and Violence
  • Online publication: 15 December 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108782791.004
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  • All the King’s Men
  • Elizabeth Elbourne, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Empire, Kinship and Violence
  • Online publication: 15 December 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108782791.004
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • All the King’s Men
  • Elizabeth Elbourne, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Empire, Kinship and Violence
  • Online publication: 15 December 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108782791.004
Available formats
×