Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-797576ffbb-xmkxb Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2023-12-10T14:12:22.074Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "corePageComponentGetUserInfoFromSharedSession": true, "coreDisableEcommerce": false, "useRatesEcommerce": true } hasContentIssue false

10 - Conclusion

The Payoff for Health Justice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 August 2022

Mary Crossley
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh School of Law
Get access

Summary

Few people, if they paused to reflect on the question, would disagree with the idea that various aspects of a person’s identity have a bearing on their experiences in the world. There are differences in how a person of twenty-five years versus one of sixty-five years mediates a dispute, trains to run a marathon, or walks into a dance club. Completing a graduate degree versus dropping out of high school affects the opportunities a person has when applying for a job or running for office. Identifying as a woman, a man, or neither will affect a person’s experience of serving in the military, seeking a job promotion, or being the primary caregiver for young children (at least in many locales). Most of these variations in experience have little to do with persons’ biological differences. Instead, they grow out of social environments and others’ expectations. To the identifiers of age, education, and gender suggested above, we can add race, disability, immigrant status, sexual orientation, and other markers of identity. And it is the intersection of those multiple various aspects of a person’s identity, combined with personal choices and life experiences, that make each person distinctive and shape each person’s experience.

Type
Chapter
Information
Embodied Injustice
Race, Disability, and Health
, pp. 221 - 240
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Conclusion
  • Mary Crossley
  • Book: Embodied Injustice
  • Online publication: 18 August 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108900928.010
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Conclusion
  • Mary Crossley
  • Book: Embodied Injustice
  • Online publication: 18 August 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108900928.010
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Mary Crossley
  • Book: Embodied Injustice
  • Online publication: 18 August 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108900928.010
Available formats
×