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Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2021

Andrew Blick
Affiliation:
King's College London
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Electrified Democracy
The Internet and the United Kingdom Parliament in History
, pp. 366 - 367
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Carey, James W., Communication as Culture: Essays on Media and Society (Routledge, London, 1992).Google Scholar
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Coleman, Stephen, Taylor, John, and van de Donk, Wim (eds.), Parliament in the Age of the Internet (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Digital Democracy Commission, Open Up! Report of the Speaker’s Commission on Digital Democracy (Speaker’s Commission on Digital Democracy, London, 2015).Google Scholar
Hafner, Katie and Lyon, Matthew, Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins of the Internet (Simon and Schuster, New York, 2006).Google Scholar
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Zuboff, Shoshana, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism (Profile, London, 2019).Google Scholar

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  • Further Reading
  • Andrew Blick, King's College London
  • Book: Electrified Democracy
  • Online publication: 11 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108602006.011
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Save book to Dropbox

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  • Further Reading
  • Andrew Blick, King's College London
  • Book: Electrified Democracy
  • Online publication: 11 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108602006.011
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Further Reading
  • Andrew Blick, King's College London
  • Book: Electrified Democracy
  • Online publication: 11 June 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108602006.011
Available formats
×