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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 April 2019

Sarah Steinbock-Pratt
Affiliation:
University of Alabama
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Educating the Empire
American Teachers and Contested Colonization in the Philippines
, pp. 305 - 320
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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  • Bibliography
  • Sarah Steinbock-Pratt, University of Alabama
  • Book: Educating the Empire
  • Online publication: 12 April 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108666961.010
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  • Bibliography
  • Sarah Steinbock-Pratt, University of Alabama
  • Book: Educating the Empire
  • Online publication: 12 April 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108666961.010
Available formats
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  • Bibliography
  • Sarah Steinbock-Pratt, University of Alabama
  • Book: Educating the Empire
  • Online publication: 12 April 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108666961.010
Available formats
×