Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-mhr6q Total loading time: 0.353 Render date: 2022-11-28T18:26:31.041Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Foreword

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 July 2019

Keith Wrightson
Affiliation:
Professor of History at Yale University, Visiting Professor at Newcastle University and Honorary Professor at Durham University.
Get access

Summary

This collection seeks to contribute to our understanding of early modern England in two ways. Substantively, it provides a set of complementary studies of aspects of economic, social and cultural change in north-east England; a relatively neglected region, yet one that can reasonably claim to have played a major role in the making of modern Britain. As such it is the direct outcome of the quickening of research on the area stimulated by the activities of the North East England History Institute. Interpretatively, it attempts to explore the interconnections between economic expansion and cultural change (using a broad definition of ‘culture’ which encompasses institutions and practices as well as attitudes and understandings, values and motivations).

The adoption of a regional approach needs no defence. A quarter of a century has passed since Pat Hudson pointed out the misleading, even distorting, consequences of studying economic change at ‘aggregate national level’ and redirected attention to the ‘regional perspective’. As she argued, major economic change usually occurs ‘within regions rather than within nations as a whole’ and in the long process we call the Industrial Revolution ‘both economic structure and human agency … in important respects, operated at regional level’, in ‘provincial concentrations’. Close regional studies, then, are essential to the understanding of economic change and to the appreciation of ‘the variety of experience and motivation which makes up the whole’.

In this respect these essays have a good deal to offer. It would be wrong to argue that the economic and social history of the north-east between the sixteenth and the eighteenth centuries has been wholly neglected. Nevertheless, coverage of the area's early modern history remains distinctly uneven, chronologically, thematically and socially. Despite a number of valuable overviews, the developments of the sixteenth, seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries remain much less fully researched than those of the late eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth. The great exception, of course, is the early history of the coal industry, in which the contribution of the Durham and Northumberland coalfield has a justifiably central place. Other aspects of economic and social change which accompanied the rise of ‘carboniferous capitalism’, however, have been subject to preliminary exploration rather than sustained analysis.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Foreword
    • By Keith Wrightson, Professor of History at Yale University, Visiting Professor at Newcastle University and Honorary Professor at Durham University.
  • Edited by Adrian Green, Barbara Crosbie
  • Book: Economy and Culture in North-East England, 1500–1800
  • Online publication: 13 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787441729.002
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Foreword
    • By Keith Wrightson, Professor of History at Yale University, Visiting Professor at Newcastle University and Honorary Professor at Durham University.
  • Edited by Adrian Green, Barbara Crosbie
  • Book: Economy and Culture in North-East England, 1500–1800
  • Online publication: 13 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787441729.002
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Foreword
    • By Keith Wrightson, Professor of History at Yale University, Visiting Professor at Newcastle University and Honorary Professor at Durham University.
  • Edited by Adrian Green, Barbara Crosbie
  • Book: Economy and Culture in North-East England, 1500–1800
  • Online publication: 13 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787441729.002
Available formats
×