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Chapter 39 - Non-epithelial Ovarian Cancers

from Section 9 - Ovary and Fallopian Tubes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2021

Tahir Mahmood
Affiliation:
Victoria Hospital, Kirkcaldy
Charles Savona-Ventura
Affiliation:
University of Malta, Malta
Ioannis Messinis
Affiliation:
University of Thessaly, Greece
Sambit Mukhopadhyay
Affiliation:
Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital, UK
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Summary

Non-epithelial ovarian cancers account for approximately 10% of all ovarian cancers. Malignant ovarian germ cell tumours and the sex cord–stromal tumours are the common ones. The malignant ovarian germ cell tumours are typically early-life tumours and in their management fertility preservation techniques are usually used. The sex cord–stromal tumours are indolent neoplasias and are associated with hormone-dependent syndromes, with endocrine manifestations. Both of these groups experience a much better outcome than epithelial ovarian cancers, with excellent survival and a manageable treatment-associated morbidity. There are other types of non-epithelial ovarian cancers such as sarcomas, lymphomas, small cell carcinomas or metastatic lesions to the ovary. These are rare entities and are not included in this chapter.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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