Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-cjp7w Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-24T08:51:17.219Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

11 - Conclusion: a summary and overview

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Bhadriraju Krishnamurti
Affiliation:
University of Hyderabad, India
Get access

Summary

Introduction

A summary of conclusions from different chapters, which throw light on the subgrouping of the Dravidian languages adopted here, will be presented with a short review of earlier work on this topic. I will briefly speculate on the probable date of Proto-Dravidian. I have left out several questions like the original home of the Dravidians and whether they were the same people who ruled the Indus valley around 2500 BCE. The Proto-Dravidian culture that I have reconstructed, based on comparative vocabulary in section 1.2.2, must help archaeologists and linguistic archaeologists to sort out this problem. I have hinted at the future direction for research in Dravidian studies, comparative and typological.

Earlier attempts at subgrouping the Dravidian languages

Serious attempts at the subgrouping of the Dravidian languages proceeded hand in hand with the study of a number of new languages, mainly in central India, namely Kolami, Parji, Naiki, Ollari, Gadaba, Koṇḍa, Pengo etc. during 1950–75. Earlier, L. V. Ramaswami Aiyar, E. H. Tuttle and T. Burrow (till 1950) placed Telugu in South Dravidian (our South Dravidian I). I have noted that Telugu is genetically closer to its northern neighbours, Gondi, Koṇḍa, Kui, Kuvi, to which Pengo and Manḍa were added later. Burrow and Bhattacharya (1953: xi) have pointed out the close relationship among Parji, Ollari, Gadaba, Kolami and Naiki. They also speak of ‘many signs of special connection between Gondi–Koṇḍa and Kui–Kuvi’.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×