Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-trcsx Total loading time: 0.186 Render date: 2022-01-17T10:07:31.734Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

9 - Digital preservation projects: some brief case studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2018

Jasmine Kelly
Affiliation:
Research assistant at the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
Elisa Mason
Affiliation:
Independent information specialist. She has a Master's in library science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Get access

Summary

In this chapter, we present brief details of current digital preservation projects. These have been chosen to illustrate a wide range of different approaches to the preservation of divergent media, and to give a snapshot of worldwide activity in digital preservation. More details of all of these can be found on their websites. Projects are listed alphabetically.

ADAPT: An Approach to Digital Archiving and Preservation Technology

http://www.umiacs.umd.edu/research/adapt/index.html

The main aim is ‘developing technologies for building a scalable and reliable infrastructure for the long-term access and preservation of digital assets’.

Lead partner: University of Maryland

Subject: Infrastructure development

Country: USA

UMIACS (University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies) runs the ADAPT (Approach to Digital Archiving and Preservation Technology) project. Partners include the San Diego Supercomputer Center, George Mason University, the University of New Hampshire and Fujitsu Laboratories of America.

Recognizing the different access and maintenance requirements of scientific, business, cultural and governmental data storage and retrieval – ranging from near-continuous access, updating and analysis to restricted and sporadic archive availability – the ADAPT infrastructure is intended to provide a powerful, adaptable tool to manage and preserve digital objects. Its three-layer approach to data storage, manipulation, access and preservation is designed to enable maximum flexibility and adaptability to changing requirements and technologies.

Metadata for complex, often highly structured material needs to be detailed and must capture crucial features of the digital object, including behavioural information about lifecycle management and preservation – content, structure, context, preservation, presentation. ADAPT uses the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference framework, including overall terminology. Secure collaboration is central to ADAPT's development, with combinations of trusted entities and distributed archive infrastructures available.

Three pilot projects operated with external partners are currently running to test digital preservation methodologies. Concerned with the preservation of NARA (National Archives and Records Administration) electronic records and geospatial scientific collections, these projects have generated papers and slides available to download.

Type
Chapter
Information
Digital Preservation
, pp. 166 - 218
Publisher: Facet
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×