Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-gbqfq Total loading time: 0.441 Render date: 2022-05-18T10:51:56.948Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

20 - The integrated processing response in herbivorous small mammals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 March 2010

D. J. Chivers
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
P. Langer
Affiliation:
Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, Germany
Get access

Summary

The amount of energy and nutrients that herbivorous mammals extract from a diet depends upon the amount of food eaten (intake) and its digestibility, but intake and digestibility do not vary independently. Apparent digestibility for any particular diet depends upon its chemical constituents, its retention time in the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and the absorptive capacity of the GI tract. The last is a function of epithelial surface area and nutrient transport rates across the epithelium (Karasov and Diamond, 1988). Within limits, forage intake increases as the digestibility of the food decreases; retention time of food within the GI tract decreases as intake increases; and digestibility decreases as retention time decreases (Sibley, 1981; van Soest, 1982; Robbins, 1983). Retention time also decreases as the volume of the GI tract decreases. All of these variables (intake, retention time, GI size and digestibility) can change in response to changes in energy demand or fibre content of the diet (Hammond and Wunder, 1991). We call the relationships among these changes, and their effect on digestible energy (or nutrient) intake, the integrated processing response (IPR).

A wide variety of birds and mammals show an IPR, as indicated by changes in size, morphology and nutrient absorption rates of their GI tract with changes in diet quality (Gross et al., 1985; Karasov and Diamond, 1988; Brugger, 1991 and references therein). The IPR of small mammals is particularly interesting because a considerable body of theory, primarily based on ruminants, argues that small mammals (adult mass less than 1 kg) should not be able to meet their energy requirements on high fibre diets, such as mature grass (Demment and van Soest, 1985).

Type
Chapter
Information
The Digestive System in Mammals
Food Form and Function
, pp. 324 - 336
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
14
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×