Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-tcprc Total loading time: 0.345 Render date: 2023-02-05T12:13:43.665Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

10 - AFTERWORD: THE 2012 BICENTENARY

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2013

Florian Schweizer
Affiliation:
Charles Dickens Museum
Juliet John
Affiliation:
Royal Holloway, University of London
Get access

Summary

‘I am sure that a man, a hundred years hence, should [he] sit down to write the history of our time, would do wrong to put that great contemporary history of Pickwick aside as a frivolous work.’ (W. M. Thackeray, The Paris Sketch Book, 1840)

‘It seems to be a national benefit, and to every man or woman who reads it a personal kindness.’ (W. M. Thackeray [on A Christmas Carol], ‘A Box of Novels’, Fraser's Magazine, February 1844)

‘There is no writing against this. One hasn't an atom of chance.’ (W. M. Thackeray on Dombey and Son, quoted in George Hodder, Memories of My Time (London, 1870), 277)

In the context of the bicentennial celebrations for the author of The Pickwick Papers and A Christmas Carol, William Makepeace Thackeray's immediate observations on the longevity and impact of Charles Dickens's stories take on a prophetic quality: Dickens's works are far from being considered frivolous, A Christmas Carol has proved to be an international benefit (not least in a commercial sense), and it would seem that no other Victorian writer was able to take on the challenge to ‘write against’ Boz.

Writing this essay in 2011 – the bicentenary year of Thackeray's birth – I should be astonished at the lack of public interest in the author of Vanity Fair, who, after all, is considered by some second only to Dickens among the great Victorian writers.

Type
Chapter
Information
Dickens and Modernity , pp. 209 - 222
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×