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Concluding Thoughts on the Role of Contexts and Settings in Youth Critical Consciousness Development

from Part III - Societal Contexts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2023

Erin B. Godfrey
Affiliation:
New York University
Luke J. Rapa
Affiliation:
Clemson University, South Carolina
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Summary

Youth today face a sociopolitical moment in which the systems of oppression that have long patterned American society are in bold relief (Bonilla-Silva, 1997, 2006). White supremacy, structural oppression, and systemic inequity are woven into the fabric of our society. They shape our present and future, as well as our past, and influence all aspects of our individual, social, and communal well-being. Developing critical consciousness (CC) (Freire, 1968/2000; Watts et al., 2011) – learning to critically “read” social conditions, feel motivated and empowered to change those conditions, and engage in action toward that goal – is fundamental to helping youth navigate and resist these oppressions, and in contributing to the fight for justice and liberation.

Type
Chapter
Information
Developing Critical Consciousness in Youth
Contexts and Settings
, pp. 318 - 325
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

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