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6 - Empowering Women: Saving Mothers and Enhancing Opportunities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 September 2019

Brian Wampler
Affiliation:
Boise State University, Idaho
Natasha Borges Sugiyama
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Michael Touchton
Affiliation:
University of Miami
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Summary

Over the last three decades, governments and international development agencies have recognized the importance of women’s status and gendered exclusion for the overall population’s well-being. Women are more likely to face poverty and greater social, economic, cultural, and political barriers to address their vulnerabilities than men. A focus on women and girls is normatively justified given that they constitute more than half of the world’s population. Yet beyond their numerical size, there is growing consensus that women’s status affects development outcomes for everyone (Sen 1999; Nussbaum 2011). Historical and existing barriers for women and girls to fully develop as individuals – due to patriarchy, paternalism, and other forms of gender discrimination – violate international human rights norms and hinder instrumental goals to further broader human development. For instance, research reveals that gender discrimination that creates barriers to girls’ education has negative spillover effects in a number of domains related to development.

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Chapter
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Democracy at Work
Pathways to Well-Being in Brazil
, pp. 166 - 197
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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