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2 - Comparing Approaches to Phonological and Orthographic Corpus Formats

Revisiting the Principle of Rhythmic Alternation

from Part I - Corpus Dimensions and the Viability of Methodological Approaches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2022

Ole Schützler
Affiliation:
Universität Leipzig
Julia Schlüter
Affiliation:
Universität Bamberg
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Summary

The authors compare approaches to studying the effects of the prosodic Principle of Rhythmic Alternation on the basis of two fundamentally different corpus formats. The first consists of orthographic transcriptions of speech, or of originally written data, while the other one provides access to the sound files of the spoken data, too. The authors’ main argument is that the nature and size of the corpus determines, or at least constrains, the range of methods that can be applied – and as a corollary of this, the findings that can be gained. Due to the greater availability and accessibility of written and transcribed spoken corpus data, much of the evidence in prior research is rather abstract and comes from large corpora accessed via the orthographic route only. Exploiting the recently available sound files of parts of the spoken section of the original British National Corpus, the authors analyse the data from an auditory perspective. This direct and highly controlled approach partially converges with and adds to the findings of previous studies. Thus, both approaches can be shown to complement each other, resulting in a better overall understanding of the phenomenon at hand.

Type
Chapter
Information
Data and Methods in Corpus Linguistics
Comparative Approaches
, pp. 46 - 72
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

Further Reading

Cole, Jennifer, and Shattuck-Hufnagel., Stefanie 2016. New Methods for Prosodic Transcription: Capturing Variability as a Source of Information. Laboratory Phonology 7(1). 8. https://doi.org/10.5334/labphon.29.Google Scholar
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Hoffmann, Sebastian, and Arndt-Lappe., Sabine 2021. Better Data for More Researchers: Using the Audio Features of BNCweb. ICAME Journal 45. 125–54.Google Scholar
Schlüter, Julia. 2015. Rhythmic Influence on Grammar: Scope and Limitations. In Vogel, Ralf and van de Vijver, Ruben, eds. Rhythm in Cognition and Grammar: A Germanic Perspective. (Trends in Linguistics. Studies and Monographs 286). Berlin/New York: de Gruyter Mouton. 179205.Google Scholar
Shih, Stephanie S. 2017. Phonological Influences in Syntactic Alternations. In Gribanova, Vera and Shih, Stephanie S., eds. The Morphosyntax-Phonology Connection. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 223–52.Google Scholar

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