Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-5rzhg Total loading time: 0.227 Render date: 2021-11-29T04:14:40.082Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

10 - Does cultural primatology have a future?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 December 2009

W. C. McGrew
Affiliation:
Miami University
Get access

Summary

THINGS TO DO

There is plenty to do in cultural primatology, especially with chimpanzees. There are so many fragmented populations scattered across equatorial Africa from Senegal to Sudan, but so few are well known. Still, the number of cultures now described and somewhat studied is enough to think of doing multivariate analyses on the ethnographic data. For example, if termite-fishing and nut-cracking really are complementary in distribution, can this be explained by rainfall, latitude, etc? (It seems unlikely to be availability of prey: there appears to be an equivalent density of mounds of Macrotermes sp. at Gombe, where termite-fishing is customary, and Bossou, where it has been seen only once in 27 years!) How many points of origin are there for the widespread patterns of material culture, e.g. ant-dipping? We do not have the historical (or prehistorical?) data on actual origin of the customs anywhere, but this might be inferred from the geographical patterning of its distribution.

Co-ordination between field and laboratory – following the precedent set by Tetsuro Matsuzawa – should be expanded and extended. Why not set up a laboratory context in which it is advantageous for one ape to teach another, to see if teaching can play a major role in cultural transmission?Whynot provide an over-supply of introduced hammer and anvil stones at wild nut-cracking sites, to see true preferences for size, shape, and weight?

Type
Chapter
Information
The Cultured Chimpanzee
Reflections on Cultural Primatology
, pp. 190 - 196
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×