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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2015

Antoine Yoshinaka
Affiliation:
State University of New York, Buffalo
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Crossing the Aisle
Party Switching by US Legislators in the Postwar Era
, pp. 241 - 256
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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